Author: Selene MacLeod

WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Pippa Bailey

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror. 

 

My name is Pippa Pilgrim, although I still write under my maiden name Bailey. I’m from England originally (born in Oxford), but I was a Royal Air Force brat, so we moved around a lot. I’ve been living in the Scottish Highlands for the last three years, with my fellow author and husband, Myk Pilgrim. 

I love the idea of inserting something weird into our daily lives, and tend to write a lot of speculative fiction, and supernatural horror. Whether that be origami that folds space and time in “The Un-making of Jennifer Hawkins” (Released in 13 Wicked Tales by the Wicked Library) or a book that allows you to make a wish, based on what you draw within it (yet to be titled but due for release in the next year)

Most my work has been released through my co-owned publishing company Pugnacious Press, or through the amazing Wicked Library podcast (which you should most definitely check out, with my latest story release, and the season 10 finally being, “Close your Mouths and Clench Eyes Tight” a Haitian bogey man story – here’s a free link to the audio adaptation by Guy Fortt.) https://thewickedlibrary.com/1020/

 
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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Trish Wilson

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror. 

My name is E. A. Black and I have written numerous short horror stories for various publications. I’ve also conducted interviews for The Horror Zine with my real name, Trish Wilson. I’ve loved horror since I was a child. I snuck my grandmothers Alfred Hitchcock books like “Stories That Scared Even Me” and I devoured all of them. I grew up on Creature Feature and Ghost Host on late night TV, which introduced me to Hammer Films which I love to this day. I also grew up in Baltimore, where Edgar Allan Poe lived for a few years and then mysteriously died. You can’t grow up in Baltimore and not get exposed to Poe. It’s practically a rite of passage, LOL.

I also worked as a gaffer (lighting), scenic artist, and makeup artist including FX for TV, movies, stage, and concerts. I did FX makeup for a forgettable indie horror film about a vampire. The movie was supposed to highlight local bands in Chapel Hill, NC, where it was filmed. The one band that made the big time was Squirrel Nut Zippers, which caught on during the swing craze of the 1990s. I did lighting for the movies “12 Monkeys” and “Die Hard With A Vengeance”. I was a makeup artist for the critically acclaimed TV series “Homicide: Life on the Street”. I had always wanted to work in the movies, and my degree in art gave me that opportunity.

 
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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Catherine Lundoff

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror.
Hi there! Thanks for including me! I write a fair amount of horror and horror-adjacent work, including a lot of ghost stories and classic tale retellings, often seen through a queer lens. You can find my collected horror and dark fantasy in a collection called Unfinished Business: Tales of the Dark Fantastic (Queen of Swords Press, 2019). You can also find my work in publications like American Monsters Part 2 and Fireside Magazine and in media tie-in anthologies for World of Darkness games such as Vampire the Masquerade and Wraith. In addition, I write “horror-adjacent” work such as my Wolves of Wolf’s Point menopausal werewolf books and vampire erotica as Emily L. Byrne.

Apart from that, I’ve always loved certain kinds of horror – ghost stories, the kind of monster stories that hum along just below the surface of fairy tales and thoughtful smart horror like Ginger Snaps and Shirley Jackson and Angela Carter. I like the snark and diverse representation of new shows like The Dead Lands (2020) as well as Victorian-style horror books and films like Susan Hill’s The Woman in Black and Del Toro’s Crimson Peak. I like a good scare, but am not big on gore.

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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions with Selah Janel

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror.

Thanks so much for having me! I write in a few genres, but horror and dark fantasy hold a special place in my heart. There’s just so much possibility in horror, so many what-ifs, that it really opens itself as a genre to unlimited opportunity for ideas. There’s something really interesting about exploring visceral, terrifying situations (that may or may not be possible) and the emotions they provoke in a relatively safe way. My background is in theater, and I’ve built and designed costumes for about twenty years, so creativity and the love of story has always been part of me. Growing up, I was the biggest scaredy cat, but there was still something about horror that fascinated me. I’d sneak books here and there or read the back of video boxes in the rental places when my parents weren’t looking. It all bothered me, but a lot of the concepts fascinated me, and that dual reaction really made me wonder what was going on. Later on, as I grew up and really started reading and watching more, I was impressed by just how many subgenres there are and how they play on your mind in different ways. Everyday life can be scary, especially now, but there’s something cathartic about taking that same fear and putting it into a different situation that you either won’t go through, or you at least know/hope that things may work out, Even if a story doesn’t end happily, there’s still that release, that catharsis, that I think we don’t always get in our own lives.

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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Kala Godin

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror.

I’m 23, physically disabled,and I typically write poetry. I didn’t know that I was interested in writing horror until I worked on Teeth. Which was a short, multi-authored story. To be honest though, I didn’t think I would be publishing poetry either. I knew I wanted to be an author, but I thought that I would be publishing YA fantasy.

 
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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With A. F. Stewart

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror.

I’m from Nova Scotia Canada, and I write under the name A. F. Stewart. Most of my horror writing so far has been in short fiction, although I do have a novella out, with another in the works, and some darker fantasy novels as well. I prefer writing in the mythological, supernatural, or psychological side of horror, although I’m not shy about the body count or the gore if need be. I love exploring the darker side of human nature and mixing with things that go bump in the night. I also never set out to write horror, but I tried it one day and enjoyed it and I’m still creating mayhem.

Why is Women In Horror Month important, and what do you say to someone who says ‘Oh, I don’t care if it’s by a man, a woman, etc., as long as it’s a good story’?”

I think Women in Horror month is important because of the prevalent dismissive attitudes towards female writers. Personally, I hesitate to call my stuff paranormal in part because I’m female and the possible assumption about “oh, she must write romance”. There’s still this viewpoint that women cannot write dark and gritty, that we’ve all must pen fluffy love stories. As to what I’d say to ‘Oh, I don’t care if it’s by a man, a woman, etc., as long as it’s a good story’, I’d reply, ‘Good for you, I wish everyone felt that way.’

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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Lori Michelle

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror. 

Thank you for having me! My name is Lori Michelle. I am the co-owner of Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing and the Editor-in-Chief of Dark Moon Digest. In addition, I am the formatter for several small horror presses, so chances are, you have seen my work.

Not sure when my actual interest in horror began. I always thought Halloween was a great time of year (I like dressing up), and the Haunted Mansion was always one of my favorite spots at Disneyland, but I wasn’t the type to go after horror movies. I think horror became more important to me when my son was diagnosed with Leukemia. I was in the hospital and started reading short horror fiction. Maybe because I could escape the horror of reality by reading a horror that I knew didn’t exist?

Why is Women In Horror Month important, and what do you say to someone who says ‘Oh, I don’t care if it’s by a man, a woman, etc., as long as it’s a good story’?” 

Women seem to get the short end of the stick in everything. We get less wages, less promotions, and more work. Even today, women writers still have to fight to get noticed. We need to help promote the strong women who help the horror community move forward. Not to shut out the guys, but to show the world there are others. Plus, I think a woman can actually capture the nuance of some horrors better than a guy can. Most of us experience severe pain once a month (along with some lovely hormone swings) and several of us have experienced life. I know that no guy will ever capture the fear I have of something happening to the child I carried for 9 months. So when someone says something like that, I let them know they need to look for nuances in writing from women, from minorities, from other voices. They will get a perspective they may not have thought of before.
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WiHM 12: Quick Six Questions With Emerian Rich

Welcome to The Horror Tree, and thank you for participating in Women In Horror Month. First, tell us a bit about yourself and your interest in horror.

I’m Emerian Rich, the Horror Host for HorrorAddicts.net and a writer, artist, and fan of all things horror! As a child, I loved reading all those spooky novels where a woman falls in love with the ghost in the lighthouse or meets a mummy guy when exploring a pyramid. When I got older I discovered vampires and my fate was sealed.

Why is Women In Horror Month important, and what do you say to someone who says ‘Oh, I don’t care if it’s by a man, a woman, etc., as long as it’s a good story’?”

In some ways it’s true. The story is the most important part, but for so many years it was said that women couldn’t write horror. I don’t understand this. Shelley, Radcliffe, Bronte, they all wrote horrific fiction, and yet still here in 2021, there are those who think good horror can only come from men. WiHM is about giving readers a chance to hear about these great women horror writers who haven’t been seen or heard because the noise of male horror writers drowns us out. Give us women the chance to change your minds!
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