Category: Guest Post

Naming Characters

Naming Characters

by JP McLean.

In his famous Romeo and Juliet soliloquy, Shakespeare asked, “What’s in a Name?”

 

Quite a lot, as it turns out. I don’t have children, so the only names I’ve bestowed are on my fictional characters and my dogs. Happily, my choices have yet to be challenged (at least by the dogs).

 

Still, it’s important to find a good fit between the character and the name you choose. A name invokes an image in a reader’s mind. The way the name is spelled, how it rolls off the tongue, how it looks visually on a page—all these things add nuance to the character.

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5 Tips for Publishing Your Own Book

5 Tips for Publishing Your Own Book

Did you ever imagine ideas for a blockbuster novel? Did you plot out character sketches; divide the plot into three acts with five turning points each, and used pathos to create a mental image of your protagonist’s best friend or wardrobe or car that will later be revealed to be garish. 

If you have gotten to that point then, you are no amateur writer. Most of us have done this before we set out on actually putting pen to paper (or finger to key).

The next logical step for these dedicated writers is to try and get their books published. This sounds pretty simple, but then, it isn’t. 
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Systemic Injustice in Contemporary Horror: How It’s Used and What to Take Away As a Writer

Systemic Injustice in Contemporary Horror: How It’s Used and What to Take Away As a Writer

Since the blockbuster success of Get Out, systemic injustice has become an increasingly prevalent theme in modern horror. And while certainly present in the genre prior to this era, 2016-2017 was when race, class, mental health, and other issues of systemic oppression really rose to prominence. Since then, we’ve gotten a wealth of horror stories tackling these issues from numerous angles — with varying degrees of success.

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Move over Plato: The Allegory of the Horror

Move over Plato: The Allegory of the Horror

By Rebecca Rowland

 

I see allegory in everything. Perhaps it’s a side effect after decades of teaching high school English. Perhaps it’s the curse of having chosen to pursue a graduate degree in literature after finishing college (not for any career preparation but in order to postpone joining the work force: I admit it!). Or, perhaps it’s simply a quality of being a horror writer. Though we’re often pushed to the back of the literary prestige line, authors of the scare-narrative are cultivators of a masterful magic show that both ignites readers’ imaginations and, quite often, pokes at their most tender trigger points like mad scientist filmmakers splicing subconscious images into montages.

No matter the reason, it’s a reflex I’ve developed, for better or worse, even if my analysis doesn’t always jive with the director’s. Akin to those hidden picture paintings popular in the 1990s, what is seen cannot be unseen (I’m talking to you, Ari Aster, who, much to my chagrin, insists Hereditary is a film about possession and not, in fact, a story of a genetic propensity of mental illness. He’s wrong, but that’s a guest blog for another time).

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How Do Horror Writers Popularize Their Content

How Do Horror Writers Popularize Their Content

It’s not uncommon to have writers create stories that never leave their personal computers. Sometimes, it is because they don’t know how to promote and popularize their content, so they leave it lying on their personal space and go on to writing the next one. If you’re one of such writers in the horror niche, then this article is for you. 

 

As a person, you probably use social for a variety of things. So who says you can’t use it to promote your content as a writer. These platforms have an audience and can connect you to a group of readers waiting to consume your horror stories.

 

If you are already a self-publishing author, then you’ve probably spent tons of hours online already trying to market your work. Thankfully, there are several popular outlets that you can use to promote your horror content and get the recognition that you deserve. 

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The effect of Horror Novels on the Human Brain

The effect of Horror Novels on the Human Brain

Horror novels are a genre of literature written to create a sense of fear in the reader. Horror novels often feature ghosts, demons, and other supernatural elements. 

They also often feature scenes of murder and violence. Horror novels often include a ‘shock ending,’ which is meant to surprise the reader.
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The Oxygen Kiss: A Magic Show

**People often talk about the holidays, the beauty, the family traditions, the sadness that can linger there underneath tinsel, and turkey dinners. Truthfully, I am not a big fan of any of the holidays, except of course Halloween. In order of spooky season, frights, fears, griefs, and guilts—I bring you all a short personal essay. **

 

The Oxygen Kiss: A Magic Show
by Jennifer Anne Gordon

 

The dark red velvet jacket brushes the floor with each step, a swish, swish, swish, swoosh like blood pumping in my veins. The silk lining is ripped a little at the back, the heel of my boot catches in it if I am not careful, it pulls it apart a little more with each careless step. Whatever is in between the silk lining and the velvet turns to dust, to ash.

Memory.
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Guest Post: Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken Angela Yuriko Smith’s Sneak Peek

  1. Guest Post: Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken Lee Murray’s Sneak Peek
  2. Guest Post: Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken Geneve Flynn’s Sneak Peek
  3. Guest Post: Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken Christina Sng’s Sneak Peek
  4. Guest Post: Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken Angela Yuriko Smith’s Sneak Peek

A preview of ‘Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken’

Angela Yuriko Smith

 

Tortured Willows—Bent. Bowed. Unbroken

Poetry by Christina Sng, Angela Yuriko Smith, Lee Murray, and Geneve Flynn

 

I’m delighted to present Tortured Willows, a collaborative collection of 60 poems exploring otherness, expectation, and tradition. 

 

What began as a deepening of the conversation based on the multi-award-winning anthology Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women became a discovery of a culture silenced and traded. This series of poems opened up a Pandora’s Box for me. I began by writing about how my grandmother lost her name (Yuriko) because Caucasians couldn’t pronounce it. As I scratched the surface of what it means to be Okinawan, or more accurately Uchinanchu, my world pivoted. This is not about a woman losing her voice, but a culture—a people—losing everything. 

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