Taking Submissions: Claw & Blossom: Equinox: Stripes

Deadline: February 24th, 2020
Payment: $25
Theme: Your work MUST also contain elements of the natural world. (Not fans of genre heavy work.)

NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS

THROUGH FEBRUARY 24TH

FOR ISSUE FOUR: EQUINOX

Theme: STRIPES

We look forward to surprising and evocative interpretations of this theme!

 

NEW: Submissions are now initially read BLIND.

Please do not include your name anywhere in your uploaded file.


WHAT

Please familiarize yourself with Claw & Blossom’s About page to get an idea of the type of work we seek. (For instance: your work MUST contain elements of the natural world.)

For more detailed information on our submission hopes-and-dreams, it’s also a good idea to check out our interview at the Six Questions blog.

For POEMS, send one poem per submission. We are partial to free verse and NOT keen on publishing traditional forms (haiku, haibun, sonnet, rhymed couplets, etc.).

For PROSE, send up to 1,000 words. This can be one piece or linked micros. Feel free to send what moves you, but it’s safe to say we are not big fans of gore/thriller/slasher stories, or romance/erotica. Genre work that comes our way will probably be a tough sell.

We do not consider multiple submissions. We ask that you wait for a response before submitting a new piece.

We do not consider unsolicited submissions of previously-published work.

We encourage simultaneous submissions. Should your work be accepted elsewhere while under consideration with Claw & Blossom, please withdraw the piece from us as soon as possible by using the Withdraw option in Submittable.

There is no submission fee.

We pay $25 USD per acceptance upon publication via PayPal. (Linked micros are considered one acceptance.)

WHITHER

By submitting your work to Claw & Blossom for consideration, it is understood that you understand and accept the following terms:

  • That you have actually read our About page, as well as perused some earlier Issues, so that you are not sending us work that (though undoubtedly lovely, or exciting and filled with All the Things) is nonetheless wholly incompatible with our aesthetic (thus making our hair fall out in clumps).
  • That the work you send Claw & Blossom is of your own making and has not been plagiarized in whole or in part.
  • That Claw & Blossom are purchasing the rights to publish your work on our website and to archive that work in our Issues archive.

If your work published with Claw & Blossom is later reprinted elsewhere, we would appreciate acknowledgement of first publication.

HOW

We take submissions through Submittable:submit

Via: Claw & Blossom.

Guest Post: How to Submit a Short Story for Publication: The Complete 10-Step Process

[NOTE: This is a shortened version of an article that appears on The Write Practice’s blog. For the full article plus examples, read How to Publish a Short Story: The Complete Guide.]

Writing and publishing short stories is the best way to get your name and your work out there to start establishing yourself as a writer. But the process of getting short stories published can seem a tad overwhelming at first. Where do I start? How do I find places that publish short stories? How do I submit a short story for publication?

The thing is, once you know what you’re doing, getting short stories published isn’t as scary as it seems.

How to Submit a Short Story for Publication: The Complete 10-Step Process

Once you’ve gotten your story polished to the shiniest it can be, you’re ready to submit. But how do you go about doing it? What is the professional etiquette for submitting? What should you prepare before you email an editor?

Here are the steps to submitting a short story to a publication:

  1. Read the guidelines

Ninety-nine percent of publications have guidelines posted on their websites. You probably already read them when you chose your publication, but you’ll need to read them again.

Guidelines are extremely important and you need to follow them. There are publications out there that will reject your story without reading it if you don’t follow the rules.

If that sounds petty, it may be, but as someone who’s edited anthologies before, I can tell you it’s a huge pain if the author didn’t follow instructions. And the last thing you want is to annoy the editor.

Remember, they get hundreds of manuscripts every time they’re open for submissions. They don’t have time to deal with an author who can’t follow instructions. Plus, it’s rude and shows a lack of enthusiasm for the publication to ignore the rules.

I repeat: Read the guidelines and follow them.

  1. Pay attention to deadlines

Deadlines are there for a reason. They’ll be listed on the publication’s website and you need to abide by them. Don’t think you can sneak in a day late with an excuse. If you miss the deadline, you’ll have to wait until the publication opens again or submit elsewhere.

  1. Format your manuscript properly

An improperly formatted manuscript is another annoyance for editors. Some publications will have specific formatting guidelines they want you to follow (again, check the guidelines), but most will simply want your story in standard manuscript format (Shunn). Go to that link and read the entire document thoroughly! Here’s a final checklist to make sure you have everything you need.

It makes it a lot easier if you format your stories in Shunn format as you write them so you don’t have to tweak later.

  1. Prepare a bio

You should always have an updated, short author bio ready to go. Bios are written in third person and are often required to be under one hundred words. (You may want to prepare two: one under fifty words and one under one hundred.)

If you have published stories in other publications, you can list them. Choose your three most recent or your three most prestigious. Don’t list everything you’ve ever published, though.

If you don’t have publications, don’t worry! Just leave that part out.

  1. Prepare an elevator pitch

An elevator pitch is pretty much what it sounds like: a one- to two-sentence summary of your story (what you could get out in the time it takes to ride an elevator). You’ll also hear it called a premise, a summary, or a logline.

IMPORTANT: Not every publication will want this. In fact, most don’t. If they don’t specifically say they want a premise, short summary, elevator pitch, etc. in the guidelines, do not send them one.

do recommend you prepare one at this stage, though. It’ll be easier later on when you’ve forgotten the exact point of your story and you need to have one. It’s also less stressful to have one prepared before submittal.

  1. Write a cover letter

Cover letters are not nearly as daunting as they seem. They’re really just a few sentences introducing yourself and your story.

You don’t need to fill a page with several paragraphs. In fact, don’t do that! Editors don’t want to spend more time reading your cover letter than they do reading your story, and they don’t need to know what made you want to write or how many pets you have.

Here’s what you need in a cover letter:

Salutation (Dear Editor is normally fine)

Story title and word count

Optional: Elevator Pitch (Again, DO NOT do this unless the publication asks for it.)

Any previous publications (It’s fine if you don’t have any. Just skip this. DO NOT say you’re a novice or this is your first story.)

Thanks and sign.

  1. Submit

Most publications take email submissions. Some use other systems, like forms on their site, Moksha, Hey Publisher, or Submittable. You’ll find where and how to submit your story in the publication’s guidelines.

Pay special attention to the guidelines. (I know I’m starting to sound like a broken record, but I can’t stress this enough.)

Paste your cover letter in the body of your email. Most likely, unless your story is a piece of flash or you’re submitting poems, you will attach your story to the email. This is the standard way to submit, but make sure that’s how your chosen publication wants it.

Make sure you take note of what kind of file the publication wants. Some are okay with a simple DOCX format, but some want an RTF. You can change how the file is saved in the SAVE AS menu.

Make sure your story is attached before sending the email! (Seems ridiculous, but I’ve sent emails without attachments several times.)

If the publication requires a “blind read,” make sure you don’t have any identifying information on the document.

Make sure you have the correct email subject line typed. (Guidelines, again.) If you don’t, it might get lost in a spam filter. If there are no specific guidelines regarding the email subject, go with: SUBMISSION — Your Story Title — Your Last Name.

Proofread your email!

After you’ve done all that, take a deep breath. It’s time.

Hit SEND!

  1. Submit again

Check to see if your chosen publication allows simultaneous submissions. If they do, that means you can submit your story to other publications while you’re waiting for a decision. [FYI: Multiple submissions allowed means the publication will take more than one story from you at once.]

I highly recommend submitting to as many publications as you can. The acceptance rate for anthologies and magazines is quite low, so you’re increasing your odds of being published if you get that story out there to as many editors as possible!

  1. Record your submission

You need to keep track of where you’ve submitted, when you submitted, when you expect to hear back, and what the response was.

There are online options for this, such as The Grinder, but you can use anything that makes you feel comfortable and that you’ll keep accurate. A spreadsheet or notebook would be fine. I double up on my tracking and use a site as well as my own spreadsheet.

  1. Wait

You’ll most likely be waiting a while before you hear anything from the publication. This isn’t a quick process and it’s often agonizing to wait for an answer, especially if you’re new to the whole submission process.

Most publications will have their expected response time listed in their guidelines, but they’re often late. Be patient. They’re sifting through hundreds of stories. Whatever you do, DO NOT email them to ask for an update (unless their guidelines say you may after a certain time). It’s unprofessional to do so and won’t earn you any points in the editor’s eyes.

 

Publish, Publish, Publish!

Getting short stories published is a pretty simple process once you know what you’re doing. (Way simpler than writing!) Getting your writing out there with short story publication is the best way to keep your work on your readers’ minds.

If you get a few rejections along the way, don’t give up! We all get them. It’s part of the writing process.

 

[To read the remainder of the article with examples of cover letters and bios, read How to Publish a Short Story: The Complete Guide.]

 

 

Sarah Gribble

Sarah Gribble

Author

Sarah Gribble is the best-selling author of dozens of short stories that explore uncomfortable situations, basic fears, and the general awe and fascination of the unknown. She’s currently cooking up more ways to freak you out and working on a novel.

Follow her on Instagram @sarahgribblewriter, or join her email list for free scares at https://sarah-gribble.com.    

Taking Submissions: Horror USA: Hawaii

Deadline: March 31st, 2020
Payment: Royalties
Theme: Horror stories set in Hawaii
Note: Reprints Welcome

An anthology dedicated to the unique horrors of Hawaii. We want readers to experience the darkest, scariest, weirdest, most terrifying elements Hawaii has to offer! We’re seeking short horror stories between 500 – 7500 words. Stories must be horror, and they must be reliant on Hawaii somehow. The “how” is entirely up to you! Originals preferred, but reprints will be considered.

Submission Deadline: March 31st or until filled. The anthology target is 50 stories. There is no limit on the number of submissions per author, but we reserve the right to limit the number of accepted stories per author.

As payment, authors will receive royalties divided by word count.

First and foremost, all submissions must be horror.

However, we recognize that horror is a very broad and nuanced genre. To that end, we’ll read stories that fit into other genres (thriller, family drama, coming of age, science fiction, fantasy, comedy, romance, et cetera) as long as the story contains horror, and as long as horror is integral to the narrative.

ALL submissions MUST meet the following requirements (documents that do not meet these guidelines will be returned to authors for correction):

1. 12-point Times New Roman font ONLY (no other fonts, please)

2. Use “SMART QUOTES”

3. Submit all documents as an attachment in .doc, .docx, or .pages format

Submit via email to [email protected]

In the body of the email, include your name and contact information.

Unpublished stories are given preference, but we consider reprints on a case by case basis, as long as all rights have reverted to the author.

If your previously unpublished piece is accepted for publication in an anthology, we take First Print and Electronic Publishing Rights, with exclusivity for twelve months from the date of publication.

If we accept your reprint for publication in an anthology, we take nonexclusive reprint rights.

A copy of our publishing contract is available upon request.

Via: Soteira Press.

Taking Submissions: Untitled Ghost Stories Anthology

Deadline: February 21st, 2020
Payment: $5 for anything under 5000 words. $10 for anything over 5000 words.
Theme: Ghost stories! ‘Nuff said
Note: Reprints Welcome

For this anthology, we’re looking for the best of the best ghost stories. The kind you tell around a crackling campfire holding back the darkness surrounding you. The kind that stick with you as you make the dark trek to your car through an empty parking garage. The kind that make you sit wide eyed in the middle of the night because the rhythmic tapping from the other room is just a little too inconsistent and, somewhere deep down, you’re sure it’s getting closer. 

Give us new and exciting takes on old tropes, give us original horror, give us classic ghost stories told expertly, give us comedic stories of spirits that are more a nuisance than a threat. We’re hoping to make this anthology larger than our first two so there’s plenty of room for all types of stories in this one, as long as they’re about ghosts.  

Anthology Title: TBD

Word Count: 2,000 – 7,500. A little over or under is fine.

Payment: $5 for anything under 5000 words. 

                $10 for anything over 5000 words.

Authors will have the opportunity to purchase an author copy at print cost plus shipping after release.

Submission Deadline: 2/21/2020

Multiple submissions welcome. 

Reprints will be considered. 

Important Bits:

Please send all submissions as a .docx or .rtf attachment with the subject line of your email as:

DBND – Ghost Stories – Story Title 

If you email is not titled this way it may end up in the wrong folder and go unread.

Stories sent after the submission deadline will be rejected unread.

Don’t sit on your submission! If we reach the word count for the anthology, we will close submissions early.

Send submissions to: [email protected]

 

Via: DBND Publishing.

Taking Submissions: Horror for Hire

Deadline: April 10th, 2020
Payment: 50% to publisher and 50% split amongst contributors evenly
Theme: Scary Stories of Workplace Terror

Stuck in a dead end job? Wish you could get payback on that boss you don’t like? Or maybe it’s a coworker stalking you, or the coffee room rituals that is getting to you. Either way; we want these scary stories all about the workplace. Because Horror is for Hire! Read below the details of our newest anthology.

Title: Horror for Hire
Subtitle: Scary Stories of Workplace Terror

Submissions guidelines:

Word count: Max 5k words, minimum 2k words.

Payment info: 50% to publisher and 50% split amongst contributors evenly.

Email to: [email protected]

We are looking for:
stories of workplace woes, sticking it to the boss in the worst way. Think of the job you hate the most and add horror to it and make it 10 times worse. You can submit non-fiction but please change names if so. We prefer exclusive stories to allow for Kindle Unlimited release. Limit of 3 per author but please submit as many as possible and we will sort through them.

Submissions open: January 13 2020

Deadline: April 10th 2020

Releasing: Spring 2020

We have a Facebook group which will be in the comment thread below.

Via: Facebook.

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