The Horror Tree Presents… An Interview with Stephen Herczeg

Derek – Stephen – I suppose we should start with how did you get into writing horror?

Stephen – I’d probably blame my Grandmother for introducing me to horror. When I was a kid, she corrupted me and would let me stay up and watch “Deadly Earnest’s Awful Movies” and “The Night Stalker”. The first story I wrote, when I was about 9 years old, was called “The Cat” and was my own version of a Night Stalker episode.

Derek – Is there something that appeals to your nature in the horror genre?

Stephen – The most enjoyable aspect about horror is the way that a great writer (Stephen King and James Herbert do this well) can paint a character and build empathy with that character, then put them through all sorts of hell before eventually dispatching them in the most unexpected or hideous way possible or bringing them back safely. It’s that building stories on the back of taking simple, ordinary folk into a terrifying world and seeing whether they survive that makes the genre so involving.

Derek – Alright, so when did you first get published and can you tell us a bit about that experience?

Stephen – I’ve only recently been published in the last couple of years, previous to that I had mainly been writing film scripts for a number of years, but a friend sent me a link to a call for submissions from Hunter Anthologies for their Sproutlings anthology of plant based horror stories. I thought I’d give it a crack and managed to crank out a couple of stories which were accepted for publication. I’ll admit the first versions read like short scripts, so I had to relearn the art of prose writing and take both through a large number of rewrites until they read like stories. Since then I’ve been refining my style.

Derek – At this time how many stories do you have published and where can our readers find them?

Stephen – So far, I have four short stories and one non-fiction piece published. They are:

  • “Death Spores” and “We came in peace” featured in “Sproutlings: A compendium of little fictions”;
  • “Alone” featured in “Hells Bells: Stories of Festive Fear by members of the Australian Horror Writers Association”;
  • “Andromeda” featured in “Anemone Enemy”; and
  • “An embarrassing fixation with body horror” featured in “The Body Horror Book”.

I also have two other longer stories to be published later this year. These are:

  • “The curious case of the sleeper” to be included in the “Sherlock Holmes in the realms of H.G. Wells” anthology by Belanger Books; and
  • “Eyes of Glass” to be included in the “Below the Stairs: Tales from the Cellar” anthology by OzHorrorCon.

Derek – Where do you find your inspiration for your stories?

Stephen – That’s the Stephen King question. To be honest inspiration can come from anywhere. As an example, one day I was walking to get lunch and wondering “what would happen if someone was walking along and suddenly their head exploded”. From that I wrote my feature length screenplay and associated short story “Death Spores”. The important thing is not where the ideas come from but to capture them and work them through to see if something can grow from the germ of an idea into a fully realised story.

Derek – When did you first know that you were going to be a writer?

Stephen – I think it’s always been there in the back of my mind. I was a voracious reader as a kid and teenager. My Mum reckons I hated the old “Dick and Jane” books, but I’d always have my head in a dinosaur or monster book. I read the Lord of the Rings when the original animated movie came out in 1978 (I was 13). I didn’t really take writing seriously until I was in my twenties. I wrote a few short stories and actually completed two 75,000 word novels. Both are crap, so I turned my attention to feature film scripts and have written sixteen so far, with a few gaining some kudos in international competitions. As I mentioned earlier, I came back to prose writing about three years ago and I’m loving it.

Derek – As you continue on in your career is there a point where you can look back and say yeah that is the moment that I knew that I was going to make it?

Stephen – For some strange reason I’ve always had a dream that one day I’d come across a novel I’ve written in an Opportunity Shop. That would tell me that I not only finished writing a novel, but got it published and printed, then someone bought it and thought enough about it to donate it to charity rather than just toss it in the recycling.

I reckon that would be the moment that I realise I’ve made some sort of mark in the literary world. I may never make a cent out of it, but at least someone may have read my book and there’s every chance that someone else will buy it and read it. I’d probably have to stop from buying it myself.

Derek – When did you first start writing?

Stephen – Apart from some formative stuff that I wrote in school, I think it all started again when I joined Toastmasters in the early 90’s. I had to write speeches and it sparked something off in me. I cobbled a few short stories together, entered a couple of Women’s Weekly and Australian Woman’s Forum competitions and even managed to get a couple of short pieces published in Picture magazine for their “My Funniest F***” column.

I then proceeded to write two novels, Dreamkiller and Sandman. I read some of that writing now and cower in fear at the atrocity pervading my mind, but it was a learning experience. The novels were quite short (75,000 words) but told fairly wide spanning stories, so I started learning script writing. Again, my early attempts are terrible but at first it’s all about learning the craft. I’ve now written sixteen feature length screenplays and numerous short scripts. I’ve made a few short films from them myself and had (one is in production) a couple made by an overseas company “Dark Fire Productions”. Four of my scripts, “Death Spores”, “Control”, “Dark are the Woods” and “Titan” have placed or won in international competitions, so I’m pretty stoked by that.

A few years ago I took up prose writing again. My first few attempts were flash fiction and as my skills have grown I’ve embarked on longer works. My latest piece to be published “Eyes of Glass” is 9,600 words. I’ve joked with my wife that I should attempt another novel. There was much groaning as she knows how lost I get when I’m deep into a project.

Derek – Can you tell our readers about your any unique experiences that have come up because you are a writer?

Stephen – I think the most fun part about being a writer, and now a published author, is the look in peoples’ eyes when they find out. I’m a little used to it cause I’ve also been a singer in a rock band, so the reaction is similar. But the average person harbours a deep desire to be a writer. They picture Stephen King and imagine it’s the life of a rock star or movie star. When we all know the reality is that most of the time we sit in front of a keyboard and zone out from the world, and that there’s not a lot of money straight off the bat, only after years of hard graft. But it is a great ice breaker and gets people interested in you; in fact discussing my writing was the opening ten minutes of a recent job interview.

Derek – What has been your most favorite thing to write, so far?

Stephen – I think one of my favourites was “Death Spores”. I took the seed of an idea about a dude walking along and having his head explode and turned it into a 110 page screenplay. The central story is about a meteor crashing to Earth and unleashing the zombie apocalypse via a space fungus. I didn’t hold back. I had exploding heads. Limbs chewed off left, right and center. Dudes gnawing off their own hands. Corpses in a hospital getting up off their gurneys and having their guts spill out all over the floor. It was all good fun and I took the opening sequence and turned it into the short story that was my first published piece.

Derek – How do you find time to balance your personal life and writing?

Stephen – I just steal time. I’ve got two primary school aged kids, plus I’m a Taekwondo instructor, plus in winter I coach my daughter’s soccer team, so I steal time where I can.

I’d love to set up a niche and allocate a fixed period to writing every morning, but it just won’t happen. From 6:30am till 8:00pm, its domestic bliss (read mayhem), then a couple of hours, at best, to relax the day away, but that includes running Herczeg Inc. So, I snatch time here and there at night or lunch times at work or when it’s quiet and I’ve got a lull in the hubbub of my employ.

When ideas spring, then I record them on the phone or on the laptop. I keep a mind map open on my desktop and add ideas or research when I can. I’m usually kept awake by ideas that are percolating and even in the shower manage to string thoughts together, though usually forget them once I’m dry.

Derek – Alright so without giving to much away, what projects are you working on currently?

Stephen – I have a forgotten project that I need to get back to called “All Creatures”. It’s a feature length script about animals going wild down the south coast of New South Wales. I’m about 27 pages in and have it mostly plotted out, just got to pull my finger out and get back to it.

On the cards are one short story for an anthology that I found through the Horror Tree newsletter, so thank you guys for the leads. Not only are they a great way to find out who’s looking out there, they get your creative juices flowing. Plus I have another short in the works for an anthology associated with one of my previously published stories. Both will be around the 5,000+ mark, so will take a bit of dedication and time.

Also, around November the theme for a local Canberra short film competition (held in March) is released. I’ve entered a couple of times with no real success, but am keen again to get the crew back together for another crack.

Derek – Please tell our readers who are your favorite authors and why?

Stephen – James Herbert is my all-time favourite author. I read the Rats trilogy when I was a teenager and just loved the way he weaves vignettes together by building up characters, fleshing them out with empathic stories then kills them off in gruesome ways. One of my prized possessions is a signed first edition of “Ash” and I was devastated when he died a few years ago.

My other favourite is Stephen King. I have collected 39 first edition hard covers and I’ve read “On Writing” about five times so far. I just love the simplicity of King’s style and the way he can create straightforward everyday characters and put them through hellish situations. I’ve tried emulating his process but it always comes out as a mess. I’m anally retentive so I need to plan out to keep the story tight.

Derek – Do your feel that your style is related to the authors that you read?

Stephen – I’d probably like to think that my style is similar to King or Herbert, but I know that’s not the case. The editor that helped me with my latest story said that it read almost like a film script. Probably due to the fact I’ve spent twenty years writing film scripts, which strips away all the descriptive and florally text normally found in great prose writing.

That’s my next aim, to develop my style to be more expansive. My ultimate aim is to reach the beautiful style of Clive Barker, but I think that’s more a dream and will take a lot of work.

Derek – Do you use beta readers; can you tell us how that experience has been for you?  Does it help?

Stephen – I’ve used a similar system with some of my film scripts. I’ve sent them out to other film makers for their comments, but the problem being that most of the feedback I receive is basically how that person would write the script not an analysis of the story itself.

I went through a full script edit with a Los Angeles based editor with “Control”. The process was brilliant as her feedback was totally independent and the final version was stripped back and rewritten from scratch. A lot of hard work, but very worthwhile.

Derek – Where can our readers get in touch with you if they want to become a beta reader for you?

Stephen – Happy for anybody to look me up on Facebook (Steve Herczeg) and PM me, or I can be contacted through my film production company’s email address: [email protected].

Derek – Where can our readers follow you on your amazing journey?

Stephen – I must admit I’ve been very slack in setting a decent social media presence and need to pull my finger out. I mostly post to my personal Facebook page and also to the one dedicated for the feature film I’m trying to get off the ground “Control”.

https://www.facebook.com/steve.herczeg.3

https://www.facebook.com/ControlTheMovie/

 

Derek – So, a question I ask everyone, if you could be any animal, what animal would it be and why?

Stephen – I would be a Rhinoceros. To me a Rhino is the sort of beast that gets out there, puts its head down and just keeps going. No matter what crap gets in the way or is thrown, it just ignores everything and continues on.

In fact I have a collection of carved Rhinos at home. I think there’s about fifteen made from all sorts of materials (wood, metal, ceramic, crystal).

Derek: Thank you so much for your time.  It has been such a pleasure working thus far. I am excited to see what you come up with next.  I am really looking forward to following you and your career path.  I see great things in the future for you.   

The Horror Tree Presents… An Interview With Alan Baxter

Derek – I suppose we should start with how did you get into writing horror?

Alan – Honestly, I don’t know. I didn’t even realise I write horror until other people told me I did. I knew I wrote dark fiction, but it’s just an honest extrapolation of the story for me. So I guess I’ve always written horror!

Derek – Is there something that appeals to your nature in the horror genre, is it the monsters, the magic, or the mixture of adding martial arts to horror?

Alan – I love all those things about every kind of storytelling. I think the big appeal with horror and dark fiction is the honesty involved. You don’t shy away from reality in horror, you follow any course of action all the way through to the bitter end.

Derek – Alright, so when did you first get published and can you tell us a bit about that experience?

Alan – My first paid publication was a short story to the online magazine The Harrow, which sadly isn’t going any more. It was a token payment of $5, but I remember it well! It was a strong validation at the time that my writing was good enough for an editor to pay for and publish.

Derek – At this time how many stories do you have published and where can our readers find them?

Alan – I’ve had published 8 novels, 3 novellas and over 70 short stories thus far. The best of my short stories are collected in Crow Shine, which you can learn about here: https://www.alanbaxteronline.com/books/crow-shine/ All my other books are available everywhere. The best place to start is this page of my website: https://www.alanbaxteronline.com/books/ You’ll also find some free short stories to read online via my site at this page: https://www.alanbaxteronline.com/dark-shorts/

Derek – Where do you find your inspiration for your stories?

Alan – Everywhere. Live is rich and varied and I see inspiration from the smallest pile of dirt to the biggest achievements of humanity. Everything is story fodder.

Derek – When did you first know that you were going to be a writer?

Alan – I couldn’t say, because I’ve always enjoyed telling stories. I decided to take writing seriously for publication in my mid- to late-20s, so I guess I left that side of things a little late. I’ve been doing my best to catch up ever since!

Derek – As you continue on in your career is there a point where you can look back and say yeah that is the moment that I knew that I was going to make it?

Alan – Every achievement is a step along the way, but every time a big achievement happens, I just immediately look for the next one. Probably my biggest achievement so far is signing a three book deal with Harper Collins (Voyager) in Australia. But I don’t know that I would ever recognize having “made it”. Maybe when I finally hit the NYT Bestsellers list?

Derek – When did you first start writing?

Alan – As a kid in primary school. I can’t remember a time I wasn’t writing stories.

Derek – Can you tell our readers about your other title, International Master of Kung Fu?

Alan – I’ve been a martial artist forever, since I was a little kid. I’ve studied a bunch of styles, but for the last more than 20 years I’ve studied a style of kung fu called Choy Lee Fut, under the grandmaster of that style, Master Chen Yong Fa. I’ve worked my way up, becoming an instructor, and now I run my own school in my hometown and still train with Master Chen as often as I can. He qualified me as an international master in 2011. It’s a strange title to have, but I’m a disciple of Master Chen, so that means it’s my job to work alongside the other disciples and ensure that Master Chen’s family legacy, his style of Chen Family Choy Lee Fut, endures for many more generations. That’s my responsibility and my pleasure.

Derek – What has been your most favorite project to work on, so far?

Alan – Impossible to say, they’re all so different. I think my favourite is always whatever I’m working on right now!

Derek – How do you find time to balance your personal life, your martial arts, and writing?

Alan – You make time. You have to, because no one has time. My wife is my assistant instructor at our kung fu school and a master in her own right. She’s also an artist, so she has studio time while I take care of our son, then I write while she takes care of him, and we run the kung fu school together. We make it work through hard work and determination.

Derek – Alright so without giving to much away, what projects are you working on currently?

Alan – I’m currently writing a new horror novel set in a fictional American small town, that opens with two young girls missing and the townsfolk all out searching. But when the girls are found, something else also comes back with them. It’s creepy and heaps of fun!

Derek – Please tell our readers who are your favorite authors and why?

Alan – Probably my all-time favourite is Clive Barker. His ability to blend fantasy, horror and the supernatural is my biggest inspiration and probably most similar to the stuff I write. I’m also hugely influenced by Stephen King, Ursula Le Guin, Shirley Jackson, Alan Moore… There are so many!

Derek -Do your feel that your style is related to the authors that you read?

Alan – It’s certainly most related to some (like Barker and King mentioned above) but I read voraciously and widely, so I try to take inspiration from everywhere.

Derek – Do you use beta readers, can you tell us how that experience has been for you?  Does it help?

Alan – I have a handful of good friends and we read for each other, and we’re brutally honest with each other. It’s something that’s grown over many years and works well for us.

Derek – Where can our readers follow you on your amazing journey?

Website: https://www.alanbaxteronline.com

Facebook: Facebook

Twitter: @AlanBaxter

Instagram: @warrior_scribe

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/917335.Alan_Baxter

Derek – So, a question I ask everyone, if you could be any animal, what animal would it be and why?

Ala – : A dragon. Because dragons are mighty and cool. Come on, who wouldn’t love to be a dragon?

Derek: Thank you so much for your time.  It has been such a pleasure working thus far. I am excited to see what you come up with next.  I am really looking forward to following you and your career path.  I see great things in the future for you.

 

Thanks very much!

The Horror Tree Presents… An Interview with Liz Butcher

Horror Tree’s very own Liz Butcher, an accomplished author took the time to sit down and be interviewed this time.  We took time to discuss her journey into the world of horror writing.  She has not only been working on her own stories but also working hard putting out quality articles for the amazing readers of Horror Tree.  Without further ado let’s get started.

Derek – I suppose we should start with how did you get into writing horror?

Liz: I don’t think it was a deliberate decision. I’ve always loved horror and it just so happens most of my story ideas are dark and creepy! I do write other genres, but even then they usually have some elements of horror. As a child I’d scare myself reading books on paranormal phenomenon, before reading my first Stephen King book at age 10. I’ve never looked back!

Derek – Is there something that draws you to the horror genre maybe it’s the ghosts, ghouls, or paranormal?

Liz: I’ve had a life-long love-affair with the paranormal, so I definitely lean towards that kind of horror. Don’t get me wrong, there’s always a time and place for good zombie or slasher horror! I just lean towards the dark and suspenseful paranormal.

Derek – Alright, so when did you first get published and can you tell us a bit about that experience?

Liz: I was first published in 2015, when my short story, ‘Wrath’ was selected for an anthology called, ‘Lurking in the Deep’. The anthology was published by CHBB and compiled and edited by Jaidis Shaw. An author friend of mine told me about the submission call, and I jumped in with both feet. I still remember when I received the email telling me it was accepted. I was so excited!
I couldn’t have asked for a better first experience. Jaidis was wonderfully professional and very patient with my newbie questions. The other authors in the anthology were also wonderful and supportive of each other—many of who I have been fortunate to work with since.

Derek – At this time, how many stories do you have published and where can our readers find them?

Liz: In current circulation there are seven short stories in various anthologies, with another coming out later this year, as well as a collaborative story due out also. Plus, I am in the editing stages of my own short story collection, After Dark, and finishing up my first novel, Fate Revenge.

Derek – Where do you find your inspiration for your stories?

Liz: I’m one of those fortunate writers that has no shortage of ideas. I find inspiration in things I see or read, from dreams I have, or just from random ideas that pop into my head. I also draw from my love of the paranormal, and from ancient history and mythology. I have an index card box on my desk so every time I get a new idea, I write it down and file it away for later.

Derek – When did you first know that you were going to be a writer?

Liz: Honestly, not until a couple of years ago. I always loved writing stories when I was a child, but stopped writing half-way through high school. I think I was just busy with other things. It wasn’t until I’d finished up at uni and had a bit more free time that I started to get that niggling feeling. I started playing with some ideas and doing a bit of research before I tried my hand at it again. But it really wasn’t until ‘Wrath’ was published that I decided I really wanted to give writing my all.

Derek – As you continue on in your career is there a point where you can look back and say yeah that is the moment that I knew that I was going to make it?

Liz: I’m not there yet! Though I certainly hope I get to that stage! Maybe ask me after my solo projects are released.

Derek – When did you first start writing for Horror Tree?

Liz: It was earlier this year. I have been blessed with a lot of ‘by chance’ occurrences on my writing journey, and I’d just happened along a post from the Horror Tree asking for expressions of interest. I jumped on it and immediately contacted founder, Stuart Conover. He let me conduct an interview for a trial—and I’m still going! When time allows, I also write drabbles for the Horror Tree’s weekly ‘Trembling with Fear’ which showcases drabbles and short stories by horror authors.

Derek – Can you tell our readers about your experience thus far writing for Horror Tree?

Liz: It’s been great! I love personalising interviews to each author, and it’s rewarding when they get a kick out of it. I get to improve my own writing skills while getting to know some fantastic authors. I’ve recently been offered the role of interview coordinator which is exciting!

Derek – So you get to interview all of these amazing authors, what has been one of your most interesting experiences doing the interviews?

Liz: Hands down, it would have to be my interview with Ace Antonio Hall. It was such a fun interview to do and the guy has racked up some serious street cred. I don’t know which fact I fan-girled most over—that he played on a track for NKOTB, or that he works on the set of the show How to Get Away with Murder… Plus he’s just an all-round talent and super nice human!

Derek – How do you find time to balance your personal life, writing your own stories, and still writing for Horror Tree?

Liz: I get up really early, haha! My day usually starts at 4am and I dedicate a couple of hours to my writing life before I either start work, or my daughter wakes up (depending on what day of the week it is). I’m super organized, and schedule time for my Horror Tree interviews, the social media promotions work I do for Juniper Grove Book Solutions, edits on my current WIP’s, writing projects and research.

Derek – Alright so without giving to much away, what projects are you working on currently?

Liz:  I have a short story collection that’s in the editing stages, called After Dark, and working on finishing my first novel, Fates Revenge. I also have a novella on the go called, ‘Leroux Manor’ and am in the researching stage of a serial I’m planning called ‘The Grey’s’.  I’ve been fortunate enough to have a few short stories released in anthologies this year, with another coming out before the end of the year called ‘Dormir’ which will feature in Twisted II, and a collaborative project I was a part of called ‘Esyld’s Awakening’ for the Collaborative Writing Project.

Derek – Please tell our readers who are your favorite authors and why?

Liz: There’s probably far too many to list here! As a child, my favourite book was ‘The Giving Tree’ by Shel Silverstein, and anything by Enid Blyton, Roald Dahl and Paul Jennings. I then moved on to RL Stine before diving head first into Stephen King and Dean Koontz. Also a big fan of Anne Rice.

Derek – Do your feel that your style is related to the authors that you read?

Liz: Not so much, to be honest! I’m certainly inspired by them, but my writing style is still very much a work in progress.

Derek – So, you use beta readers, can you tell us how that experience has been for you?  Does it help?

Liz: I’ll let you know! This is my first attempt at reaching out for beta readers for my short story collection, and I have been blessed with about half a dozen expressions of interest. I think it will be good insight as to whether there’s elements that don’t work, or if anything needs to be expanded on etc—essentially want to get rid of any hiccups before I attempt to self-publish it.

Derek – Where can our readers get in touch with you if they want to become a beta reader for you?

Liz: They can either DM me on Instagram, Twitter, or my Facebook author page.

Where can our readers follow you on your amazing journey?

Website: http://lizbutcherauthor.wixsite.com/lizbutcher

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lizbutcherauthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/lunaloveliz

Instagram: @lunaloveliz

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13845425.Liz_Butcher

Derek –: Thank you so much for your time.  It has been such a pleasure working thus far. I am excited for our future here at Horror Tree.  I am really looking forward to following you and your career path.  I see great things in the future for you.   

The Horror Tree Presents… An Interview With Patricia Stover

Patricia Stover, a published author took the time to sit down with us and talk about her experience thus far into the world of horror writing.  Her charming southern accent complimented her kind demeanor.

Patricia – please tell the readers of Horror Tree a bit about yourself?

Patricia: Well there isn’t much to tell, I am from Oklahoma.  I am a stay at home mom and love spending time with my son.  So far, I have two published stories, both with Scout Media in the “of Words.” Series.   So I started writing in college and sort of just continued with it.

You stated in your blog that your childhood shyness played a factor in your love of the horror genre, as you have grown-up have you left the shyness behind or does it still follow you?

Patricia: I guess I am still a little bit shy but a lot better than what I was when I was younger.  It was great though because it helped me get into horror.  I remember I would stay up late watching horror movies, scary myself to death.  But the next night I would stay up watching them again.

Ah, Interesting…  So where do you get the inspiration for your stories?

Patricia: Who knows?  No, I honestly guess most of the time from my own head.  I have a new novel I am working on, Hitchhiking with The Devil.  The inspiration for this novel came to me as I was taking my son to the pumpkin patch.  As we drove I saw a hitchhiker on the side of the road.  The way he looked, the way he made me feel, were both driving forces for the creation of the central character.

You have two stories if I am not mistaken that have been published in with Scout Media (http://www.scoutmediabooksmusic.com) , in their “of Words”, series.  Creepers in the Journey of Words and then Plastic Boy in their newest release, A Haunting of Words.  How did you get started with them and how has your experience been thus far?

Patricia: When I finally wanted to get serious about my writing, was right after I had my son.  In college, I studied English and I knew that I was going to be writing.  Something that helped me was when I joined a group called fiction writing on Facebook.  It was here that I met the admin for the group who was actually one of the owners of Scout media.  He then posted about an opportunity for submission with Scout Media.  Luckily, I had some stories that I had written in college, so I took one out.  I spent time editing it and then rewrote parts of it before I then submitted it.  I was lucky that it was selected and published.  Their next period of submission, I wrote a completely new story and was excited when it to was selected.  It has been a great experience so far; the owners really take care of their authors.  I honestly am so grateful to be working with them.

You have a very interesting picture on your website above your name, any stories about that?  It just looks so haunting…

Interviewer:  Seriously check out this image.  I love it.  So creepy yet so inviting.

Patricia: Yes, I love that picture.  Amy Hunter from Amy’s Designs did that picture for me.  Amy is talented and she actual does book covers and you can find her on Facebook.

When did you first start writing?

Patricia: Honestly, I never really wrote in high school, expect for my journal and maybe a bit of poetry. Then when I started college I was study nursing.  I started at as nursing aid while I was also taking my general classes.  It was here that I fell in love with writing and English.  So I changed her major.

So tough question but what authors do you read?

Patricia: Stephen King, Clive Barker, but honestly I will pick up just about any horror book.  Stephen King, my favorite story by him is probably, The Mist, but it is so hard to decide, I just love all his stories.

Any plans for a full-length novel or will you be sticking to the short story format?

Patricia: I am currently working on my full-length novel, Hitchhiking with the Devil.  At this time, the novel is still in the early phase but, I have been working on it for the last two years.  I will continue to do short stories, I believe it is great practice.  Not to mention it has really helped me with character development.  The ability to work on small parts without having to focus on a huge novel is great.  I am currently working on editing and publishing another short story, as I edit I will add and sometimes subtract parts of the story.  My first short story was about 4,000 words, my most recently published story is around 3,000 words.

What is something that sets you apart from other writers?

Interviewer: At this point I really must stop and just say again how nice she was. She was so modest while answering this question.

Patricia: My beta readers, say that my writing has a sort of twilight zone feel to it.  I honestly do not believe that I have a specific genre, I will just write what comes into my head.  Most times that is a horror story.

Very intriguing, Well Patricia what’s next for you? You have some very successful stories already published, so where do you go from here?

Patricia: I am really focusing on my full-length novel at this time, I have been looking for a publishing company.  In the future, I have an interest in si-fi and fantasy writing but most likely I will be staying with the horror genre.

Sounds amazing, so if you could offer a piece of advice for our readers here at Horror Tree, what would it be?

Patricia: Research writing, read about writing, find other people that are successful and ask them for advice.  You never know until you ask, you will never learn until you try.  You must have a thick skin, the first stuff you write isn’t going to be awesome, but just keep writing.  Get Beta Readers, I have a group on Facebook, Patricia Stovers Beta Readers.  While I will listen to their advice I will ultimately write the story in my own vision, but it helps having someone to bounce ideas off.  Oh and get a great editor, I have an amazing relationship with my editor and it has helped me so much.

Thank you so much, if our readers wanted to get a hold of you where could they do that?

Patricia: You can always message me on Facebook.  Fans can subscribe on my website to get updates from me.  There is a link on my home page.  Fellow authors can check out the Facebook group called Fiction Writing is Great.  Also check out the links below.

Website: http://patriciastover.wixsite.com/patriciastover

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authorjkenedy

Scout Media: http://www.scoutmediabooksmusic.com/a-journey-of-words

Interviewer:  Patricia it has been so great chatting with you, thank you so much for your time.  I will be waiting rather impatiently for the release of your next story.

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