Taking Submissions: This Twisted Earth (vols. 2 & 3)

Deadline: July 24th, 2017
Payment: % royalties per story published in e-book and paperback form and a contributor’s copy

Deadline for both volumes: Monday 24th July 2017
Payment: 4% royalties per story published in e-book and paperback form. You will also receive a physical copy of whichever volume your story appears in.
‘As this is laying the groundwork for an ongoing story in a way that few anthologies do, it’s definitely one to keep an eye on. When Volume 2 comes out, you know we’ll be on board.’ Starburst Magazine
This Twisted Earth vol. 2: Twisted Histories – due for release at EdgeLit 2018
Dig deeper into how This Twisted Earth began: explore ‘known’ events such as the reign of the Tyrant, reveal secret histories and cultural insights through Twisted Earth creation myths, or shed light on some familiar characters through their early adventures. We can also begin to investigate what really happened to shatter Time in such a cataclysmic manner.
This Twisted Earth vol. 3: Twisted Tomorrows – due for release at FantasyCon 2018
Peer into the future to show us what might yet be: chart the rise of powers such as Rome Resurgent, probe the ever-changing landscape of cultural evolution; of the progress made or dangers unleashed by the reweaving of Time’s threads. Bring forth new tales of familiar characters, hunt down the truths behind the Cataclysm, and show us what it means to choose our destiny.

‘…an anthology that breaks the format of what we consider an anthology to be demands more attention, and asks that the reader be comfortable with feeling out of their comfort zone. But it’s this quality, I think, that allows This Twisted Earth to shine.’ Renegade Revolution

Prospective writers from all countries and cultural backgrounds are invited to join our ‘This Twisted Earth’ Facebook Group in order to interact with the editor and the other writers on the project. There, you will also find the ‘world bible’ – a vital collection of Twisted Earth lore which has recently been updated by the editor, Dion Winton-Polak, to include details from the first volume of This Twisted Earth.
Send your completed story to [email protected] as either a .doc or .rtf file. The subject of your email should have your Surname, the word ‘Histories’ or ‘Tomorrows’ to indicate which volume you feel your story belongs in, and your word-count.
To avoid disappointment please ensure your submission reflects the brief and sticks to the following format:

  • 4000 to 9000 words long, in Standard Manuscript Format.
  • Typed in Times New Roman, size 12.
  • Include your full contact details (name/address/social media profile/email address) at the top of your document.

Thank you. We look forward to hearing from you.

Via: Six Minutes To Midnight.

Taking Submissions: American Upheaval

Deadline: June 1st, 2017
Payment: Royalties

**Deadline: June 1st, 2017**

Prompt: Literature is inseparable from context: medium, culture, and conflict. Whether that be social media or formal writing, we are always part of a conversation with the world. As writers, we live our lives in the margins, we go beyond a social conversation and create an artistic dialogue. This is the way we process and handle big events in our history, this is the way we change our history; by recognizing what is happening within our environment and putting it in ink. “People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction, and anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead turns himself into a monster” (Baldwin, 1953). We want to read your work outing the monsters and keeping our eyes open. We want to share your experience with the world as a statement.

Writing reflects the human experience—especially that bound by social and political pressures. We write in hopes to disrupt power dynamics and increase the voice of subalterns (Said, 1979). Onyx Neon seeks submissions of disruptive poetry for a social activist anthology.

The Project: In Fall 2017, Onyx Neon will release a collection of poems under the umbrella of American Upheaval. The world is reacting to a drastic shift in administration—and those reactions are raw, loud, and critical. We want poems that add to the political conversation.

This collection will be edited by Head Editor of Onyx Neon Shorts, Lindsay Deter-Wolf, with Kit Martin.

Submission Instructions: Please submit 1–6 poems. Each poem (including its enjambed stanzas and verse paragraphs, your chosen formatting) should appear on its own page, and the submission itself must exceed no more than six pages in total.

What we pay: Our standard collection rate is a percentage of the final product based on how many poems are in the collection.

What’s the deadline: No poems will be considered after June 1st.

First Print and Electronic Publishing Rights: When your poem is published for the first time, that publisher has taken your work’s First Print Rights. This means that every subsequent publication must list where it was first published. In this case, we also take Electronic Publishing Rights. Other publishers may be uncomfortable publishing your work electronically after it has been printed by Onyx Neon. For all intents and purposes, after your work is published by us it can only be marketed as a reprint, which could limit the number of markets that will accept it thereafter. It is up to you—the author—to decide if publishing your work in print and/or eBook formats and/or on the web (surrendering First Publishing Rights for royalty-based payment) method is what you want to do.

What rights do we get from you? Our contract states that poetry we acquire from you is yours, now and forever. We come from a background of both fiction and open source coding. We do not require exclusivity. We publish the work so long as you allow, and stop publishing it per your preference.

What about works printed elsewhere? (known as a Reprint): If you own the rights and we like it, we will print it. First publishing rights, and Exclusive E-publishing Rights, are not important criteria for Onyx Neon. Good writing and original ideas: these are important.

How to submit: Submissions should be emailed to (shorts)(at)(onyxneon.com). Please put “Poetry Collection—‘your name’—‘collection/poem title’” in the subject line to ensure we see and log it appropriately. Do not attach a cover page or put your name on any of the pages. All contact information must be enclosed in the email. Submit your work in .doc, .docx, .rtf, LaTex, Twine or plain-text format. Do not copy and paste submissions into the body of the email, but please include a summary of your work.

Do you accept multiple submissions? Yes. If you send them all in one email it’s much easier for us to track.

Do you accept simultaneous submissions? We will absolutely consider a poem that you sent to someone else. We would, however, hate to fall in love with your poem and not be able to publish it. Please alert us immediately if you decide to publish your work elsewhere.

Have you read my poems? We reply to everything when we have finished evaluating, and we will let you know if we are going to publish it or not. We hate waiting to hear back from people as much as the next person, so we do not wish that on anyone.

Why are you so slow? We read a lot, and we leave the vault sometimes. But keep in mind, we are reading your work. If you have not heard from us after three months, please feel free to send us an angry email with lots of grumpy emoticons and pictures of cats.

If your work doesn’t fit into our anthology’s scope, it will still be considered for general publication.

Please submit to (shorts)(at)(onyxneon.com).

We look forward to reading your beautiful, original poetry.

Via: Onyx Neon.

Taking Submissions: The Chromatic Court: Tales of the Lovecraftian Arts

Deadline: June 15th, 2017
Payment: 4-5% of gross profits depending on length.

Guidelines
18thWall Productions
Curated by Peter Rawlik
“I pray God will curse the writer, as the writer has cursed the world with its beautiful stupendous creation, terrible in its simplicity, irresistible in its truth…”
~Robert W. Chambers, The King in Yellow
Robert E. Chambers’ The King in Yellow features a being, the King in Yellow himself, who is embodied in the play of the same name, and in the color yellow.
We want to follow in the footsteps of Chambers, invoking links between specific colors, the mythos deity they might represent, and what influence they might have on the various arts.
For example, what terrifying things are hinted at by the titles the Black Goat, the Green Man, the White Worm, and the Red Queen, and to what arts are they linked?
Give us tales that invoke the chromatic avatars of the Great Old Ones and the impact they have on the arts, but as we all know the arts are open to interpretation, and could easily include architecture, literature, cuisine, pantomime, and haiku. Art is in the eye of the beholder, and color is only an abstract concept, but fear and terror are very real, and so are the Great Old Ones.
What We Want
Fresh takes on the Cthulhu Mythos, Chambers’ mythology (the Yellow Mythos), and Cosmic Horror. This isn’t the place for Lovecraftian clichés. The more it feels like a “lost” Lovecraft story, or relies on the clichés of the genre, the less interested we are. Creativity is the watchword.
While we are open to straight horror, we much prefer submissions closer to Chambers’ style and tone. Which is to say, we’d greatly prefer dark fantasy with a cosmic horror undercurrent. If you’re unfamiliar with Chambers: The Twilight Zone, Manly Wade Wellman’s fiction, and THING are all excellent examples of that sort of tone and sensibility.
We want complex tales of cosmic horror, the arts and artists all properly hued. To avoid overlap of colors, monsters, titles, and arts story pitches must be made to the curator first. We already have a King, and we already have a Prince; help us a fill the rest of the court.
In addition to unique and clever takes on the Chromatic Court concept, we’d prefer: strong, developed characters;
Inspiration
We recommend reading Robert W. Chambers’ The King in Yellow, the monumental work of dark fantasy that started everything. It’s the foundation of so many of the above ideas and mythology. Lovecraft linked the King in Yellow—both the entity and the play—to his own revised elder god Hastur.
T.E.D. Kline’s Black Man with a Horn linked Nyarlathotep to jazz and horned instruments, making Kline’s story an early forbear of this concept.
My own story The Sepia Prints, featured in my novel Reanimatrix, establishes Cthulhu as the Sepia Prince, and intrinsically links the being to opera.
Payment: 5% of the gross profit will be paid for each accepted story. These payments will be issued to you at quarterly intervals. Stories under 1,500 words will only receive 4% of the gross profit.
Rights: First World Digital and Print.
Deadline: June 15, 2017
Word Count: 4,000-16,000
How to Submit your Story:
• All stories should be sent, as an attachment, to [email protected]
• The file must be formatted in .doc or .docx.
• The interior of the document must be in double spaced Times New Roman (12 point font).
• Indents must be placed through your system’s Paragraph function; do not set indents by pressing tab or space. If you already have tabbed or spaced indents, please remove them first. Please use full em dashes (—).
• At the top of your document, please include William Shunn’s submission header.
• Tell us a bit about yourself in the body of your email. Don’t stress this, it won’t make or break your submission.
• Place the collection you’re submitting to, your name, and your story title in the subject line of your email. For example, “Speakeasies and Spiritualists / Rose Mackenberg / So You Want to Attend a Séance?”
Curator Bio
Pete Rawlik is the author of the novels Reanimators, The Weird Company, and Reanimatrix, and the co-editor for the anthology Legacy of the Reanimator. His fiction has appeared in Tales of the Shadowmen, The Lovecraft eZine, Talebones, Morpheus Tales, Crypt of Cthulhu, and Innsmouth Magazine. The concept for The Chromatic Court evolved out of his story The Sepia Prints, which became a key chapter in Reanimatrix.

Taking Submissions: SciFiMonkeys StoryTime Season 1

Deadline: May 1st, 2017
Payment: Royalties (See details below.)

Season One
Currently we are seeking science fiction with a deep space theme. A galaxy far, far way…if you will.
Season One Submission Deadline: May 1st, 2017

How to submit:

At the moment, we are accepting submissions through our Online Submission Form. Only submissions through the online submission form will be accepted.

What we’re looking for:

We will be publishing 3 SEASONS of genre anthologies each year. Each Season will have its own theme. See the SEASONS page to see what seasons we are currently looking for and what seasons have past. We will also be publishing other anthologies, so feel free to send us work at anytime. We will post if and when we have themes for other anthologies. We publish anthologies with Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror themes.

Please note that we do not consider novel excerpts, or anything with illustrations or photographs.

Our anthologies will be available in paperback and ebook formats exclusively through Amazon.

What’s the deadline?

Check the SEASONS page for each seasons deadline. Otherwise, please feel to send us other work that may be great for another anthology as we will be publishing others.

International submissions:

We’re based in the US but we accept submissions from authors all over the English-speaking world.

Rights
We ask for first serial rights on any story we publish. This means that the story should not have appeared anywhere else, either in print or online. (This includes publication on an author’s own website.) When we publish a story, we ask for a brief period of exclusivity (roughly 18 to 24 months), and the right to keep the story in print. We do not place any limits on what you can do with your story after the exclusivity period.

Word count
We are able to consider stories for publishing on the site that are between 1,000 and 20,000 words in length; please do not send anything longer than this. Stories shorter than 1000 words may be considered for extra exclusive content when the season is published in book format. (Most of the stories have been submitted so far are between about 2,000 and 7,000 words.)

Do you get paid?
Each story once published to the site will come with a listing of how to find everything from that author and a weeks paid advertising to help drive traffic. Once the Season is finished and published in book format with exclusives added 50% of the profits will be deducted for charity, 10% will go to our editors and 40% will be split between the authors to be paid quarterly.

Submission fee…

Yeah, we don’t have one of those.

Multiple and simultaneous submissions:

Please feel free to send us more than one story at a time. We do have a limit of 3 submissions per day. Please send each story through the form one at a time, and not together in one document.

We do understand if you want to submit to more than one outlet at a time. However, please let us know if a story you’ve submitted to us has been accepted elsewhere!

Our response times:

We aim to reply to all submissions within three weeks, although sometimes we may fall behind.
If you’re waiting for a reply from us, please keep an eye on your promotions and junk mail folder, as our replies can sometimes make their way there. If you have submitted a story and not heard from us after 4 weeks, please check your spam/junk mail folder again. If there’s nothing there, email us: [email protected] Please include your name and story title.

 

CLICK HERE FOR THE ONLINE SUBMISSION FORM

Via: SciFi Monkeys.

Taking Submissions: Their Coats All Red: Dark Tales of Empire

18thwall

Deadline: April 15th, 2017
Payment: 5% of the gross profit will be paid for each accepted story. These payments will be issued to you at quarterly intervals. Stories under 1,500 words will only receive 4% of the gross profit.

o the office of the Prime Minister:

As you have no doubt been made aware from previous correspondence, Mr. Gladstone, problems of an unusual nature still arise in the further reaches of Her Majesty’s empire.

You remember the transport we lost in the Chinese seas, and manpower spent keeping it from the press. One of the officer’s wives, a Mrs. Kathleen Morland, was found drifting in the same waters. Yes, two years later. She wore strange finery, speaking in a language that we still haven’t placed, and only telling a broken story through far more broken English. She complains of voices from some long ago time, saying things she wishes she could forget. The ship which rescued was followed to port by strange lights.

One exploratory party Africa reported total darkness for a period of 106 hours. No trace of the sun. Light suddenly returned around noon. When their guide returned the following day, he was nearly mad with grief. “The darkness now resides within us. Our light has faded.”

Just as I was about to hand this to my secretary, one more report arrived. Trouble along the Indian border, as ever. Word is fragmentary, also as ever, but suggests something unhealthy and alive in the biting wind.

While troubling, I don’t believe there is anything the foreign office can do at this time. We’ll continue to look into these on a case by case basis—but the difference in geography, actors, and dates seems to suggest we can do little but watch, record, and pray.

Yours truly,

[The signature is missing, crumbling away to a burnt-out blackness. The letter shows signs of having been thrust into the fire, but saved before the letter was wholly consumed.]

What We Want

Their Coats All Red: Dark Tales of Empire is seeking strange stories which are steeped in the history of the British Empire from about 1880 to 1905. These must be tales which capture the feel of the high Victorian era.

We don’t want stories of the Empire itself—we want stories of the weirdness underneath. Ghosts, spirits, madness and monstrosities are all welcome. Make it psychological or physical, but make it good.

Crucially, every submission must contain an element of the weird, the uncanny, the supernatural, or the paranormal. This may be in the form of spirits, hauntings, monstrosities, folklore and folk-horror from the region in question, or simply the completely inexplicable. Dark, foreboding, or unsettling are good keywords. Weird fiction also encompasses dark fantasy, of a sort, opening the door for dark historical fantasy a la Manly Wade Wellman, Neil Gaiman, or Tim Powers.

We are looking for stories which reflect the vastness and variety of the Empire, and so suggested geographical settings include, but are not limited to:

  • India and the Raj
  • The East Indies in general
  • China up to and including the Boxer Rebellion
  • Egypt and the Sudan,
  • West Africa and the later Ashanti Wars
  • South Africa, both the Zulu Wars and the Boer War
  • At sea, around, or going to or from, any of the above

We want to see the impact of Empire and its infrastructure, from any viewpoint. The military side of life on the frontier is an obvious one, and an encouraged one, but not the only approach.

We will check your history.

Characters of any relevant culture, ethnicity, or allegiance are welcome, not only the British soldiers. The lost, bewildered British soldier or colonial administrator; the embittered Indian servant or Rajah; the scorned Egyptian woman and the dying Boer farmer are all equally possible protagonists. What we do not want are stereotypes. Think real people in strange situations. No cartoon racists or noble savages.

Farmers marching under a parched South African noon to fight the Boer, with whom they often had more in common than they had with their own officers. Young London women shipped with their husbands to quarters in Calcutta with little company save their Indian servants. Traders and planters in Malaya, fighting the monsoon shadows, and the forlorn garrisons in the Sudan. The sailors of the West Africa squadron, seizing slave ships off the Gold Coast.

The Bombay char wallah, beaten once too often by the English Major for being too slow with his tea. The Zulu who trades his iklwa for a Martini rifle. The Egyptian woman who finds her officer lover will not acknowledge her in the street.

Complex and human are the watchwords. Be sensitive to the humanity of characters on all sides.

We would also like to encourage stories with female central characters. The high Victorian era is when modern women began seriously entering their own careers, studying science, and starting their own businesses. While there were many problems in the era, it would be exciting to see achievements celebrated, in fiction, instead of the era’s failings presented as the only path for women. This is, after all, also the era of Nellie Bly, Annie Oakley, Mary Kingsley, Isabella Bird, Marie Curie, Cristina Trivulzio Belgiojoso, Harriet Martineau, and Jane Addams, among many, many others.

Using the Cthulhu Mythos is acceptable, however we do not want simple retreads, pastiche, or Lovecraft-lite. Write something fresh, creative, and, of course, deeply embedded in the Empire if you choose to try this route.

If you would like to write a story regarding an earlier event (such as the Sepoy Rebellion), please query the editors.

What We Don’t Want

Don’t rely on ahistorical cliché. Corsets weren’t that tight (except for a hot five minutes in 1850s France). The English weren’t repressed, and all the evidence usually carted out to prove it is a hoax (“Lie on your back and think of England”) or a joke that started about Americans (“They cover the most scandalous, shapely legs in their house—the piano legs!”). Falling into ahistorical cliché is a serious black mark against stories.

We’re looking for realistic takes on the Empire itself. In other words, the Empire was neither cartoon monstrosity nor entirely wonderful. Like so many things, it was a mix of positive and negative. If stories try to address empire as a concept, or the English Empire in particular, it’s essential to keep this in mind. Stories which fail to keep this in mind will be an increasingly hard sell.

This does not mean we’re looking for stories where “The English only thought they were doing positive things in their Empire building.” We’re not interested in anything so dismissive of the past. We’re not looking for comments on Empire along the lines of “actual evil” versus “perceived good,” but the much more difficult and human, “actual evil” vs. “actual good.”

A general historical story of the period, however weird and unnatural, will not cut any ice—it needs to be rooted in the Empire.

We are not interested in political screeds for or against the English Empire, or empires in general.

We’d rather not receive missionary stories. It’s an over-used take on colonial issues, and unless it’s astonishing or very, very different, we’re not likely to let you get away it.

Stories set in locations such as America, Canada, Australasia, and the West Indies are also feasible, but they will be a harder sell unless they have directly relevance to the theme of Empire. Stories may be set in Britain, but they would have to relate to an aspect of Empire. No Victorian gents merely musing how they got shot in the leg in Afghanistan, please.

Sundry Details

Payment: 5% of the gross profit will be paid for each accepted story. These payments will be issued to you at quarterly intervals. Stories under 1,500 words will only receive 4% of the gross profit.

Rights: First World Digital and Print.

Deadline: April 15th, 2017

Word Count: 4,000-16,000

How to Submit your Story:

  • All stories should be sent, as an attachment, to [email protected]
  • The file must be formatted in .doc or .docx.
  • The interior of the document must be in double spaced Times New Roman (12 point font).
  • Indents must be placed through your system’s Paragraph function; do not set indents by pressing tab or space. If you already have tabbed or spaced indents, please remove them first. Please use full em dashes (—).
  • At the top of your document, please include William Shunn’s submission header.
  • Tell us a bit about yourself in the body of your email. Don’t stress this, it won’t make or break your submission.
  • Place the collection you’re submitting to, your name, and your story title in the subject line of your email. For example, “Their Coats All Red / Rudyard Kipling / The Mark of the Beast.”

John Linwood Grant is a writer of strange period tales and dark fiction, author of the Tales of the Last Edwardian series, including A Study in Grey, and co-editor of Occult Detective Quarterly.

Matthew Willis is a journalist and writer, author of a period sea novel Daedalus and the Deep, and editing credits include the recent Stalking Leviathan anthology.

Via: 18th Wall.

Taking Submissions: Undeath And The Age Of Steam

Deadline: June 1st, 2017
Payment: Royalties and a contributor’s copy
Not horror, but with undeath involved you may be able to weave some elements in

We’re looking for Steampunk stories—specifically, mysteries that take place in a Steampunk setting. A mystery is the story of a crime and its solution. As for Steampunk, you can find a good, concise description at Steampunk.com. Supernatural elements are welcome.

Here are the particulars:

Length: Maximum 10,000 words.
Deadline: June 1, 2017
Submit to: editorjessfaraday at hotmail.com

Format: paperback and e-book
Payment: share of royalties plus author copies
Contract: we use a modified EPIC contract.

Additional Information:

A lot of Steampunk focuses on the European experience. Elm Books is dedicated to promoting diverse authors and stories. Priority will be given to stories that feature characters from traditionally underrepresented groups—main characters of color, female protagonists, differently-abled main characters, LGBTQ main characters, and so on. Also, priority will be given to stories set outside of Europe, especially those examining colonialism from a non-European perspective.

We will not print stories containing graphic sex or violence.

Sound like enough of a challenge? Get writing!

Via: Elm Books.

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