Category: Ongoing Submissions

Ongoing Submissions: New Maps

Payment: Contributor’s copy and a token payment
Theme: Fiction that takes into account the effects of resource depletion and environmental damage on the future of the world, and the existence of hard limits to what humankind can do to mitigate these effects. This also must follow the same rules as our Earth

New Maps accepts submissions, year-round, of short stories falling within the genre of deindustrial fiction. Before you submit your story, please read through these guidelines to make sure you’re submitting to the right place. If you have any questions about anything on this page, please feel free to contact us.

Suitability

As mentioned, New Maps is primarily a magazine of deindustrial fiction. (We also publish occasional essays and book reviews; to inquire about the possibility of having such a piece published, please email the editor.) Deindustrial fiction shares some aspects with a few other genres, but is distinct from them in other ways. To understand how we define the genre, the best reference is our About page. Here we will mention a few things we are and are not looking for in submissions.

As New Maps uses the term, deindustrial fiction is:

  • Fiction that takes into account the effects of resource depletion and environmental damage on the future of the world, and the existence of hard limits to what humankind can do to mitigate these effects.
  • Fiction that takes place in the world that you and I live in: that is, an Earth that obeys the same physical laws as the real Earth.
    • Stories may include elements of the metaphysical, supernatural, or paranormal, but only to the extent that you, the author, find it plausible that these things may actually happen in our world as you understand it.

And it is not:

  • Simply generic speculative fiction. While deindustrial fiction may be considered a kind of speculative fiction, it is more specific, in the ways mentioned above.
  • The same as dystopian or utopian fiction. Real, unadulterated utopias and dystopias are absent from the historical record, and we consider their existence incompatible with human nature. Even in the most idyllic society there are significant problems, whether at the level of the culture or of the individual. Likewise, even in the most brutal dictatorship, there is at least some room for people to experience little everyday joys.
  • Coterminous with postindustrial fiction. While there is significant overlap between the two, there are important differences.
    • Perhaps most saliently, the two differ in the understood cause of the decline and fall of civilization, and which civilization. With postindustrial fiction, nearly any cause will do, from resource depletion all the way to wayward meteors and nanobots, and the setting may be on a totally invented world. Deindustrial fiction narrows focus to what happens during and after the winding down of our current fossil-fueled industrial age, due to resource depletion and its consequences—although against that background, some places may certainly experience declines (and ascents) from unrelated causes that pop up, as these things do.
    • A postindustrial story may (or may not) take its setting to be a lull during which a civilization rebuilds. But in deindustrial fiction, civilization just isn’t coming back the way it was: civilizations may certainly still arise, but they will have to find ways to make do with less energy than we currently use, will not look just like ours, and will definitely not arise from the ashes to colonize space.
    • As well, postindustrial fiction is often understood to take place after the collapse of civilization has reached its rock bottom and perhaps stabilized, whereas deindustrial fiction may take place at any point on the downslope, including the very near future, and often finds valuable stories to tell in the instabilities that come from decline.
  • The same as postapocalyptic fiction. The decline of the current global civilization will be long and ragged, not sudden and cataclysmic, except possibly in isolated pockets. Even then, if a single catastrophe brought down a vast society, that society very probably had termites in the framework to start with, and this should be acknowledged.
  • Traditional spacefaring sci-fi. While space operas and deindustrial fiction are both often set in the future, they share very few other commonalities, and stories featuring travel to other planets will almost certainly be rejected.

Technical

  • Most digital document formats are accepted (.odt, .doc/.docx, and anything else readable by pandoc). A standard layout such as Shunn’s Modern Manuscript Format is encouraged.
  • There is no hard minimum or maximum story length, but we will probably publish only a limited number of stories longer than 10,000 words. Very long (novella-sized) short stories, if outstanding, may be considered for serialization. If you have a novel, seek a publisher who’ll publish it as a novel!
  • Submissions are open year-round on a rolling basis: submissions received too late for one issue are automatically considered for the following issue.
  • Stories should be previously unpublished, except those published on small personal websites or other venues with very limited exposure. If your story was previously published in such a way, please tell us the details in your letter.
  • Simultaneous submissions are allowed; please inform us if the story is being considered in another venue. If your story is accepted for publication elsewhere, please inform us as soon as possible.
  • Send your story to [email protected], with subject line “Story Submission: [Story title].” In the body of the email please include
    • the name you would like the story to appear under,
    • the story’s title and word count,
    • your contact information,
    • and any other relevant information as outlined above or as you consider pertinent.

    We will confirm submission of the story as soon as possible.

Compensation

  • Accepted authors will be compensated on a per-word basis, and will also receive one free copy of the issue in which their story appears, with the option to request up to ten more at cost. The current per-word compensation is $0.00¼ USD.
  • Payment is made upon publication.

Via: New Maps.

Submissions: Let the Bodies Hit the Floor Series

Payment: $40.00 and a contributors copy
Theme: Slasher, stalker, serial killer crime fiction and must be written in the horror genre

Do you want your story to appear in our newest series, Let the Bodies Hit the Floor?

A Pile of Bodies, A Pile of Heads: Volume 1 & 2

Let the Bodies Hit the Floor Series

Submission Guidelines
Please read carefully. Submissions that don’t meet the guidelines will be automatically rejected.
  • All submissions will be reviewed and chosen stories will be published in A PILE OF BODIES, A PILE OF HEADS – The Let the Bodies Hit the Floor Series Volumes 1&2, which will both be released in August of 2021

  • Submissions must be between 5,000 and 10,000 words (Word counts are firm)

  • Title, submitter’s name, pen name (if different), story word count and author email address must be centered at the top of your submission

  • Submissions must be 12 pt. Times New Roman font, double spaced with special first-line indentation of 0.5″

  • Submissions must be in .Docx or .Doc format with 1″ margins all around

  • Submissions should be clean and edited

  • Submissions must fit the theme of slasher, stalker, serial killer crime fiction and must be written in the horror genre. Think Dexter, Mind Hunters, American Horror Story, and Bates Motel to name a few examples. NOTE: volume 2 submissions must feature a female antagonist (slasher, serial killer, stalker, etc.).

  • Submissions cannot contain graphic sexual or rape scenes

  • Submissions must not have been published elsewhere before in any medium

  • The number of stories published per volume will depend on word count of the chosen stories, but will be no less than ten stories and no more than twenty per volume

  • Authors may submit as many stories as they want for review, however, there will be a limit of one published story per author, per volume

  • Simultaneous submissions are okay if author provides notice of such

  • Submissions will remain open until further notice and selected stories will appear in the first two volumes, or subsequent volumes as published. There is no submission deadline.

  • Submissions will be read in the order in which they are received

  • Authors will be notified as soon as possible if their story was selected or not

DON’T END UP IN THE CIRCULAR FILE!

You worked hard on your story, so don’t take a chance on it never being read. Did you read the Submission Guidelines? Did you follow them? Does your story meet theme and word count? Unfortunately, we cannot consider stories that do not meet submission guidelines. It could be the best story that mankind will ever read and we will never know. Why? Because if your submission doesn’t meet guidelines, it will automatically be deleted. Don’t let this happen to you.

Submit Your Story

Authors That Are Selected For Inclusion Will:
  • Have their story published in the anthology

  • Receive a one-time payment of $40.00 (USD) per selected story

  • Receive a free paperback copy of the anthology within 45 days following the release date

  • Have access to buy author copies of paperback and hardcover editions at publisher’s cost, plus shipping

  • Agree to sign a Memorandum of Agreement giving permission for the story to be used in the anthology

Via: Sinister Smile Press.

Ongoing Submissions: Boneyard Soup Magazine

Payment: 5 cents per word, 1 cent per word for reprints
Theme: H
orror and dark fantasy genres and are open to almost anything you can imagine within those categories.

Note: Reprints Welcome

Procedures

All submissions for fiction should follow proper manuscript format. Please send them to [email protected] Attach submissions in .doc or .rtf format. We will not accept submissions embedded in the body of an email. Along with your manuscript, include a cover letter. The letter should include your bio. We will not consider multiple submissions or simultaneous submissions. 

Payment

To receive payment for your story or non-fiction article, you will need a PayPal account. We pay 5 cents per word for original fiction up to 6000 words on publication for first world rights. For reprint fiction, we pay 1 cent per word up to 6000 words for nonexclusive reprint rights. For nonfiction articles, we pay 5 cents per word up to 3000 words. 

Fiction

Boneyard Soup Magazine publishes quarterly in a digital format. We want stories in the range of 2000 to 6000 words.

We publish in the horror and dark fantasy genres and are open to almost anything you can imagine within those categories. Traditional Gothic. Pulpy horror with an ’80s vibe. Body horror. Ghost stories. Horror comedy. Don’t be afraid to submit if your tale falls within the horror and dark fantasy genres. However, we are not interested in stories with extreme violence or overt sexual themes. 

Non-Fiction

One ancestor to the modern museum was the cabinet of curiosity, or Wunderkammer in German. These were private collections of strange and interesting objects amassed by wealthy persons in Europe. The earliest date back to at least the middle ages. 

In that spirit, Boneyard Soup Magazine is committed to developing a wonder cabinet of sorts. Each issue will feature up to two non-fiction articles curated under the title Cabinet of Curiosities. Authors of these pieces will delve deeply into topics from the world of horror.

The idea is to explore the strange side of reality. Urban legends. Documented ghost stories. Myths. Odd, terrifying, or befuddling events from history. Anything creepy, weird, or horrifying is fair game here.

Important to note: These are not intended to be academic or scholarly. While still attending to good writing practice, imagine you are telling your story to a close friend.

Please submit a proposal for your article first. Include potential sources in your proposal. Upon the editor’s approval, you will send the written article. Pieces published under the Cabinet of Curiosities heading should be no more than 3000 words. 

Reprints

We are happy to consider your short story if it’s been published in another place. However, be sure to include the word REPRINT in the header of your email. For example: STORY TITLE (REPRINT).

Response Time

Boneyard Soup Magazine is a small publication and as such we ask for your patience. Response time could be as much as four weeks. After that time, please send an email to [email protected] with the word QUERY in the subject line. In your email include the title of your story and the date submitted. 

Please do not respond to rejection letters.

Artwork

Each issue of Boneyard Soup Magazine will feature original cover art and sketches to accompany published stories and articles. Like our taste in fiction, our taste in art is also broad. 

If you are interested in seeing your artwork on the cover of one of our issues, please submit the artwork in question to [email protected].

If you would like to produce original sketches for an upcoming issue, please submit an inquiry with samples of your artwork to [email protected] If interested, we will contact you with details for the story we’d like you to draw for.

Payment will be negotiated with each artist we work with. 

Via: Boneyard Soup Magazine.

Ongoing Submissions: The Common Tongue Magazine

Payment: $0.03 (dollar) USD per word
Theme: Fantasy with a dark theme

We are interested in fantasy with a dark theme. We accept both works set in our Athuruin Shared Universe as well as original work in an original setting. Please see the legality tabs below for more information.

Cover Letter. Please include a short blurb about yourself as well as a cover letter in the page preceding the body of your manuscript. This means page-break in between the cover letter and the manuscript body.

Format. Submissions must be in Microsoft Word (.docx) format. Please adhere to standard manuscript formatting for your submission. See our article on formatting standards.

Type. Must be a short story or poem manuscript. We do not accept comics, picture books, graphic novels, or anything beyond text-based submissions.

Length. Submissions must be 600-6,000 words in length. We cannot accept more than this due to submission space and budget. Note: We are more likely to accept smaller works than longer, unless the latter is rather exceptional in quality.

Tonality. The tone of our setting is dark, and therefore we value submissions that hold true to this sense of foreboding mystery, danger, gore, and cruel truth. While we appreciate uplifting, optimistic tones and will consider them when reviewing your submission, please be aware of our guidelines toward accepting high fantasy, grimlight, epic fantasy, and mundane fantasy manuscripts.

Genre. We only accept submissions that are fantasy with a dark tone. We are aware of the many sub-genres of fantasy, however, and consider many varied versions, such as dark fantasy (Blizzard’s Diablo, Andrzej Sapkowski’s The Witcher, Clive Barker’s Weaveworld, H.P. Lovecraft), grimdark fantasy (Mark Lawrence’s Emperor of Thorns, Steven Erikson’s The Crippled God), sword & sorcery fantasy (Robert E. Howard’s Conan, Charles R. Saunders’ Imaro). We do not accept pure low fantasy (A.K.A. urban fantasy, magic realism, contemporary fantasy, historical fantasy), young adult fantasy, children’s books, fables, fairytales, or superhero fiction.

There are exceptions to low fantasy submissions, however, if the setting differs from our own world in a way that it could be mistaken for another world altogether (apocalyptic, nations/physical territories having been altered, scientific rules being altered, etc). Meanwhile, we accept epic fantasy in only a few special instances, and they must still retain a dark tone despite their scope (i.e. dark epic fantasy).

Canon. Submissions must adhere to our setting as close as possible, but writer interpretation is accepted and accounted for.

OR…

Original works. If the work is not set in one of our shared universes, then we want work that has not been published elsewhere. That means the work must be in a universe that you have created. We do not accept strong contemporary fantasy (A.K.A. urban fantasy) unless that setting differs from our own in such a way that it is no longer reminiscent of our own. We prefer stories that are as original as possible, particularly in the conflicts and characters. We are unlikely to enjoy stories featuring elements we have seen repeatedly, like characters meeting in a tavern, or a villain with a motivation to take over the world. We enjoy stories that are layered, especially with time. Think the Star Wars franchise (including Legends) with characters being a part of a long bloodline of exploits, events, and conflicts that stack on top of each other.

Extreme Content: We do not encourage the extraneous use of sex and violence. Instead, we condone a code of extreme content penmanship coined “Graphic but Meaningful”: if the extreme sex and violence has a deeper meaning in the story aside from wanton and tasteless elements, then we will consider it. This magazine is not aimed to the advanced literary adult (sensual erotica novels) audience, and therefore must incorporate semi-appropriate themes in the story.

Poetry: We accept poetry up to 40 lines that has not been published elsewhere. We are willing to accept bard-singing or other types of fantastical poetry, and as long as it’s dark and fantastical in content, we are not strict about the type of poetry. Please consult us with your ideas for more information. Note: We do not accept poetry collections. We pay $20.00-$40.00 per poem.

Novel Excerpts or Serials: We are NOT interested in novel excerpts or serials–we only want self-standing stories.

Reprints: We publish only originals (stories that have never previously appeared anywhere in print or online). We do NOT consider reprints (stories that have previously appeared anywhere in print or online, including on a personal website or blog, or self-published on Kindle, or as Patreon or Kickstarter rewards). For stories not set in our Athuruin Shared Universe or one of our other share universes, we buy First Serial rights–the right to be the first place to ever publish that story. If the story has already appeared in print or online, or been given to readers in exchange for a donation or patronage, the story has already been published and we can’t be the first place to ever publish it.

Multiple Submissions (more than one story submitted at a time): We do NOT accept these. Please wait until you have received a reply to your submission before sending another. Considering two submissions simultaneously puts you at an unfair advantage and puts more work on our editors.

All Writers: We welcome submissions from all writers, of all nations, nationalities, ethnicities, backgrounds, faiths, genders, orientations, identities, experiences. We’re looking for great stories, by anyone and everyone. We welcome submissions from new and unpublished writers. Many of our authors are new writers and often their sale to The Common Tongue was their first pro-rate short fiction sale. All our rejection letters are personalized, which many new writers tell us they find helpful in revising their stories to submit elsewhere and in developing their writing in general. Please submit!

Via: The Common Tongue Magazine.

Ongoing Submissions: Flash Point Science Fiction

Payment: $10
Theme: Fantasy, Science Fiction, Slipsream, and releated.

Story Guidelines

Flash Point Science Fiction wants speculative fiction stories from 100 to 1,000 words in length. Send us your science fiction, fantasy, slipstream, and everything in between, so long as it’s short. We here at FPSF are partial to flash fiction and want to see the flash market grow. So as much as it pains us, please take your 10,000 word tour de force elsewhere. We’re not looking for the next Brandon Sanderson. (Unless you are, in fact, Brandon Sanderson, in which case we’d be delighted!)

What we’re looking for:

-Fantasy (all kinds—epic, adventure, contemporary, urban, grimdark, fairy tale, magical realism, myths and legends, etc.)
-Science Fiction (all kinds—hard, space opera, military, near future, science fantasy, cyber punk, dystopian, etc.)
-Slipstream (make it as weird as you want, so long as it works)
-Anything that makes us laugh, cry, think, or smile.

What we aren’t looking for:

-Horror—it can be spooky or menacing, but we’re not a horror market, so the fright factor should not be the primary appeal.
-Literary fiction—this is a genre market, so there needs to be an SF&F element, however slight.
-Gratuitous sex or violence—don’t be that guy.
-Fanfic—original concepts only, please. We know there was a lot going on in Hobbiton while Frodo was away, but that’s not our property and it’s not yours either.


Submission Specs

In terms of how your story should look, we recommend you read William Shunn’s Proper Manuscript Format. This is the industry standard and we think it’s a good one. It won’t matter for our submission portal, which is plain text, but should we accept your submission and request the manuscript file, we will expect it to be in this format.

Please do not submit to us via email directly. Submissions received in this manner will be deleted unread.

We do not accept unsolicited reprints. Even if it was posted on a personal blog or website, so long as it’s public anyone who has access to the internet can read it, and that qualifies as publication.

No simultaneous submissions. This means you shouldn’t submit the same story to us and any other market at the same time.

No multiple submissions. One story at a time please.

Our normal response time is 30 days. If you haven’t heard back from us after 60 days, please contact us and we’ll bump your story to the front of the line. If we were fast readers, we wouldn’t be reading flash, right? Wrong, we still would, because we love it.

Note: Flash Point SF welcomes submissions from writers of all races, colors, religions, genders, gender expressions, ages, national origins, disabilities, and sexual orientations. No matter who you are, we want to give you a voice (provided that voice stays under 1,000 words)!

Payment:

We pay $10 per story for first worldwide rights and for non-exclusive reprint rights. We also reserve the non-exclusive right to republish your story in our annual anthology, as long as this right is activated within 24 calendar months of the story’s original publication date. These anthologies are anticipated to consist entirely of material originally published by Flash Point SF. Payment will be determined if and when they occur.

Via: FLash Point Science Fiction.

Ongoing Submissions: Poetry London

Payment: £30 for one poem and £20 for each subsequent poem
Theme: All forms of poetry, including translations

Poetry London is a leading international magazine, where new names share pages with acclaimed contemporary poets. We also publish a wide range of poetry in translation.

The magazine is published in February, May and September. We receive a vast amount of submissions, so reading can take up to three months, and if your work is shortlisted, maybe even longer. You might find it helpful to read the magazine first, to see if your work is suitable.

We appreciate subscriptions, as we depend on these to survive, though if you don’t subscribe it won’t affect your chances!

Please ensure that you pay the correct postage when submitting poems and books for review. As a small charitable organisation, we don’t have the resources to pay for any additional costs incurred and won’t be able to collect any post where incorrect postage has been paid. Thank you!

We pay poets £30 for one poem and £20 for each subsequent poem. Appropriate adjustments may be made for very long poems. Review and interview fees are agreed in advance with the Reviews Editor and benchmarked at £45 per 1,000 words.

TO SUBMIT POEMS


Poetry London aims to publish the best, most exciting poetry being written now, and we are always interested in work by unpublished poets, as well as celebrated ones.

Submissions are read by Martha Sprackland, Poetry Editor.

At the moment, we are especially interested in poetry in translation. For submissions of translations, or discussions of translation projects, please contact us directly on [email protected] All other submissions should follow the process below.

Both postal and electronic submissions are welcome and all are carefully read.

For postal submissions, please send a maximum of six poems to:

Martha Sprackland
Poetry London
Goldsmiths, University of London
New Cross
London
SE14 6NW
UK

Always include a stamped addressed envelope for our reply.

We will reply by email if you are sending your work from abroad. In these circumstances you may submit your poems by post and request an email response in your cover letter. Unfortunately we cannot return manuscripts from outside the UK.

For online submissions, please click the button below and follow the instructions.

Simultaneous submissions are acceptable if you are submitting online through Submittable. Please withdraw your poems if they are accepted elsewhere.

submit

Via: Poetry London.

Ongoing Submissions: Dread Imaginings

Payment: 1 cent per word
Theme: Horror stories with original monsters

This is a personal project, and I’ll be surprised if these do not change as it unfolds.  That said, I try to be prompt with any updates.  For now, here’s the news:

What I’m not looking for:

  • Non-Fiction
  • Poetry
  • Artwork
  • Multiple or simultaneous submissions
  • Re-submissions of previously rejected MS (if I am interested in seeing a revision of something, I will specifically request it)
  • Reprints  


What I am looking for:

  • Stories up to 4000 words (firm), previously unpublished on paper or electronically.
  • Stories that read fast.  Don’t bog the tale down with a lot of explication.     
  • Stories set in the contemporary world, rather than historical fiction or tales set in fantasy/science fiction landscapes.   
  • Stories that present your protagonist’s encounter with the horrific, disturbing, uncanny, weird, macabre, and/or grotesque.  
  • Stories that are character-focused.  That encounter should have some impact upon your protagonist’s outlook and/or actions as the story unfolds.
  • Stories that succeed by using concrete detail to show what happens and convey why it is important, rather than trying to tell the reader why.  Resist the urge to explain.  
  • Originality.  Creature-features are welcome, but your own monsters will probably be an easier sell than vampires, zombies, werewolves, et. al.    


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Ongoing Submissions: Mysterium Tremendum

Payment: $50
Theme: Where religion and horror collide, do read below to see exactly what they mean!

We originally conceived of Mysterium Tremendum as an anthology scheduled for release sometime in 2021. Due to frequent interest expressed in this project by writers and readers alike, we’ve decided to try something a little different. We’re excited to present Mysterium Tremendum, a quarterly chapbook featuring fiction, nonfiction, and poetry exploring the intersection between weird fiction/horror and the holy.

The title of the series comes from Rudolf Otto’s The Idea of the Holy, in which the German Lutheran theologian describes the “numinous” at the heart of religion as an experience preceding any systematic dogma or ethical component–a “feeling,” in short, much closer to the sublimity of horror than any sensation popularly (read “dully”) conceived as “religious” (love, happiness, well-being). An astounding array of writers have since, whether consciously or not, furthered Otto’s observations. Some of them explicitly tie horror fiction to the holy. Scholarly works directly examining this connection include Victoria Nelson’s The Secret Life of Puppets, Douglas Cowan’s Sacred Terror: Religion and Horror on the Silver Screen, and Kirk J. Schneider’s Horror and the Holy. Georges Bataille is also relevant here, along with the Communion books of Whitley Streiber, and contemporary philosophers like Rene Girard, Jeffrey Kripal, and Erik Davis.
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