How to Write the Middle of the Horror Story: 7 Tips

How to Write the Middle of the Horror Story: 7 Tips

The middle of the horror story is a pivotal point in any book. Depending on your inspirations, the first half sets up all the characters and events, while the second half pays off on what has been established. 

But how do you write it? There are many different ways to approach this section that will give your readers nightmares for weeks—and increase their attachment to your story. In this blog post, we will discuss seven tips on how to write a great horror story.

Tip 1: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Haunting and Creepy

The middle of horror stories is pivotal and usually has the most tension. It’s a home to jumps scares, gore, and haunting. This section should be haunting and creepy enough that readers will never forget it—even when they think about your story years later.

This tip can be used in other genres like fantasy or sci-fi, where you want things to feel ominous or unearthly. For example, if there are evil spirits at play within this section of the story, then use “creaky floorboards” as well as “strange sounds from under the bed” for atmosphere-building purposes.

Tip 2: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Suspenseful and Thrilling

The middle of horror stories is usually the most suspenseful and thrilling after building your characters. This section should always keep readers on edge, not knowing what will happen next. 

It can be a brilliant idea to have your main characters make some hard decisions as well—things that they regret later or are haunted by in their dreams. This tip can also be used for thrillers or any other genre where you want things to feel nail-bitingly tense.

Tip 3: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Emotionally Charged

The middle section of horror stories is usually where all the emotional tension comes to a head. This is when you really want your readers to feel what your character feels, so there are many ways that you can achieve this! 

This tip can also be used in other genres like fantasy or sci-fi, where you want things to feel magical and enchanting. For example, if there is an evil spirit at play within this section of the story, then use phrases like “I felt a cold shiver run down my spine as I watch the dark gray sky turn to black. Feeling my blood freeze in its veins, it’s like nothing living can escape this creeping stillness.” Such sentences will suck your reader into physically feeling what your character goes through on the inside, and it can really enhance their reading experience.

Tip 4: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Full Of Surprises, Twists, and Turns

The middle section of horror stories is usually where all the suspenseful twists happen—this is your chance to really toy with readers’ emotions. You can give out more information about what happened in this section that wasn’t revealed before, or you could have events unfold that are unexpected even for your main character. 

Whatever it might be, as long as it makes people scream like crazy, then consider it a success. This tip can also be used in other genres where you want things to feel surprising and innovative. 

For example, if a cursed object is at play within this section of the story, then use phrases like “the room got colder and darker” or “I felt something brush past me.” You know the feeling. 

It’s just like that moment before you walk into a dark room and flick on the light switch, unsure of what to expect while peering in cautiously—and then suddenly it hits you. The sense that something is amiss or not right about this place even when everything appears normal at first glance: your heart speeds up, adrenaline begins pumping through your veins as if preparing for battle—you can’t help but take another step forward slowly with heightened senses alerting every sensation from an unfamiliar smell wafting nearby to a creaking floorboard beneath your feet without making too much noise.

Any small sound could be enough warning for some unknown creature lurking in wait around the character. And all you want now is out of there as quickly as possible.

Tip 5: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Scary and Frightening 

The middle section of horror stories is usually where all the scare tactics come into play. This is your chance to really terrify readers! 

It can be a great idea to have some jump scares in here as well as scary imagery that lingers for days after they close their book. This tip can also be used in other genres where you want things to feel spine-tingling and terrifying. 

Tip 6: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Full of Dark Humor 

The middle section of horror stories is usually where all the dark humor comes to life. This is another chance to toy with readers’ emotions! 

You could have some very witty dialogue in here that has people laughing one second and hiding behind their hands from fear moments later. This tip can be used in other genres where you want things to feel twisted and darkly humorous.

For example, if a cursed object is at play within this section of the story, then use phrases like “the laughter sounded more sinister now.” Such sentences will make your readers laugh when they read them and feel fear for their own safety as well.

Tip 7: The Middle of Horror Stories Can Be Full Of Glimpses into Recovery 

You can also use this section to show how your main character is recovering from what’s happened so far or showing how they are looking forward to a brighter future. It might not be something that changes everything about the story, but it can give readers hope as well as some closure if things seem bleak at first glance.

This tip can be used in genres where you want things to feel hopeful and uplifting. For example, if your main character has been cursed by an object, then use phrases like “I walked out into the sunlight” or “a deep breath flooded my lungs with fresh air.” 

Readers will be on the edge of their seats as they follow your protagonist’s journey. They’ll want to know what happens next because you’ve given them a glimmer of hope that things can get better for him or her.

In Closing

You can try using these tips in other genres as well or come up with your own creative ideas for this section. Whatever you do, don’t forget that scary twist at the end. It always leaves people wanting more.

Author Bio

Sherri Carrier is a professional writer who’s been publishing her own work since childhood. She also manages an essay writer service. Sherri gets inspiration from the people and authors she admires.

Stuart Conover

Stuart Conover is a father, husband, published author, blogger, geek, entrepreneur, horror fanatic, and runs a few websites including Horror Tree!

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