Taking Submissions: Corporate Cthulhu

Deadline: June 1st, 2017
Payment: $0.03 cents per word

WE NEED TEN TALES OF HIERARCHY HELL
AND BUREAUCRATIC NIGHTMARE!

Of all bureaucracies, corporations are the most powerful, seeming to have a life and will of their own.  They’re privately held with a multi-national reach, seemingly bottomless resources, and armies of lawyers jealously guarding their trade secrets.  Anything and everything is justified by the bottom line.  Who needs a Cthulhu Cult when you’ve got Cthulhu, Inc.?

Into this insidious world are thrust our heroes—the curious, the puzzled, and the frustrated.  Defying authority, seeking answers they’d be better off not knowing, the secrets they discover threaten their sanity and their lives.  Will they become the next whistleblower media hero?  Or disappear, leaving nothing behind but an empty desk and whispered rumors in the break room?  Remember: it’s nothing personal—just business.
Corporate Cthulhu is a Lovecraftian horror anthology about the intersection of the Cthulhu Mythos and corporations or other large bureaucracies.

This is an OPEN call for submissions—anyone and everyone is free to submit a short story to the slush pile.  Feel free to share this with other writers you think might be interested.

What We’re Looking For

•    Short stories up to 7000 words.

•    Original, previously unpublished fiction.

•    We’re particularly interested in submissions from writers traditionally underrepresented in sci-fi, fantasy, and horror fiction.  This includes racial, ethnic, and religious minorities, women, LGBTQ+ individuals, and people living with disabilities.

•    Stories must include at least a passing connection to the Cthulhu Mythos and/or Lovecraft’s other work.  The stronger the connection, the more likely the story is to be accepted.

•    Stories that make skillful use of Lovecraftian horror themes: insanity, helplessness and hopelessness, inherited guilt, old isolated locations, books of forbidden knowledge, ancient extraterrestrial influences on humanity, the risks of runaway science, civilization vs. barbarism, humanity’s insignificance on the cosmic scale of space and time, unanswered questions about what lurks behind the curtain of reality, etc.

•    Although we’re expecting a lot of stories where management is a cult in disguise (and that’s fine!), we encourage writers to think outside the box.  Other elements of the business cycle include labor (a union strikes over a bizarre demand) and customers (how far will a struggling company go to meet their biggest customer’s increasingly strange requests?).

•    Although the primary focus is on corporate bureaucracies, ANY large private-sector bureaucracy is fair game. This could include (among others) charities, nonprofits, NGOs, private universities, for-profit hospitals, labor unions, large churches, fraternal organizations, youth groups, etc.

•    Stories set in any time period during the modern industrial capitalist era (roughly 1800 on up).  Query first for stories set in other time periods.

•    Comedies, parodies, and/or satires are acceptable.

What We’re NOT Looking For

•    Romances or erotica.

•    Stories under 2000 words or over 7000 words.

•    Stories taking place in governmental or other public-sector bureaucracies.  As much fun as it may be to have Cthulhu running the IRS, save those ideas for a later Political Cthulhu anthology.

Payment

If selected, authors will receive $0.03 cents per word for original, previously unpublished fiction.  Original fiction strongly preferred; query first for reprints.  In the unlikely event that we do accept a reprint, payment will be $0.01 cent per word.  Publication is dependent on a successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the project.  There will be no kill fees.

Rights

Exclusive global English first print and digital rights for one year, and nonexclusive print and digital rights for term of copyright.  All other rights are reserved to the author.

Submitting

Stories should follow the format laid out in the submission guidelines; if not, it may be automatically rejected.  Submissions should be emailed to [email protected] with the story included as an attachment in .doc, .docx, or .rtf format, and must be received no later than midnight, Central Standard Time, June 1st, 2017.  The email subject should read [Submissions: Story Title by Author Name].  If accepted, minor edits and revisions may be requested.  The Kickstarter campaign will begin after the stories have been selected.

Via: Pickman Press.

Taking Submissions: This Twisted Earth (vols. 2 & 3)

Deadline: July 24th, 2017
Payment: % royalties per story published in e-book and paperback form and a contributor’s copy

Deadline for both volumes: Monday 24th July 2017
Payment: 4% royalties per story published in e-book and paperback form. You will also receive a physical copy of whichever volume your story appears in.
‘As this is laying the groundwork for an ongoing story in a way that few anthologies do, it’s definitely one to keep an eye on. When Volume 2 comes out, you know we’ll be on board.’ Starburst Magazine
This Twisted Earth vol. 2: Twisted Histories – due for release at EdgeLit 2018
Dig deeper into how This Twisted Earth began: explore ‘known’ events such as the reign of the Tyrant, reveal secret histories and cultural insights through Twisted Earth creation myths, or shed light on some familiar characters through their early adventures. We can also begin to investigate what really happened to shatter Time in such a cataclysmic manner.
This Twisted Earth vol. 3: Twisted Tomorrows – due for release at FantasyCon 2018
Peer into the future to show us what might yet be: chart the rise of powers such as Rome Resurgent, probe the ever-changing landscape of cultural evolution; of the progress made or dangers unleashed by the reweaving of Time’s threads. Bring forth new tales of familiar characters, hunt down the truths behind the Cataclysm, and show us what it means to choose our destiny.

‘…an anthology that breaks the format of what we consider an anthology to be demands more attention, and asks that the reader be comfortable with feeling out of their comfort zone. But it’s this quality, I think, that allows This Twisted Earth to shine.’ Renegade Revolution

Prospective writers from all countries and cultural backgrounds are invited to join our ‘This Twisted Earth’ Facebook Group in order to interact with the editor and the other writers on the project. There, you will also find the ‘world bible’ – a vital collection of Twisted Earth lore which has recently been updated by the editor, Dion Winton-Polak, to include details from the first volume of This Twisted Earth.
Send your completed story to [email protected] as either a .doc or .rtf file. The subject of your email should have your Surname, the word ‘Histories’ or ‘Tomorrows’ to indicate which volume you feel your story belongs in, and your word-count.
To avoid disappointment please ensure your submission reflects the brief and sticks to the following format:

  • 4000 to 9000 words long, in Standard Manuscript Format.
  • Typed in Times New Roman, size 12.
  • Include your full contact details (name/address/social media profile/email address) at the top of your document.

Thank you. We look forward to hearing from you.

Via: Six Minutes To Midnight.

Trembling With Fear 03/26/2017

‘Trembling With Fear’ Is Horror Tree’s weekly inclusion of shorts and drabbles submitted for your entertainment by our readers! As long as the submissions are coming in, we’ll be posting every Sunday for your enjoyment.

Stuart Conover

Editor, Horror Tree

The Heart Song

“I wanna stop, Mama. It hurts.” Desiree said. She was bent over the family washbasin, her hands plunged deep into the ice filled water.

“You’ll do no such thing.” Mama said “If you move those hands, I’ll whip you good.” There was the quick rapping of wood on wood; the spoon, Desiree thought, striking the table.

Mama marched across the room behind her. Desiree heard her heavy steps on the dirt, the opening and closing of cupboards, the rattling of jars and the clanging of pots; a frustrated grunt then a squeak of exaltation followed by the dry, scraping din of metal.

Desiree couldn’t take it anymore. Her hands felt warm and tingly, alive with cold fire. She removed them from the icy water.

The pain was quick and sharp. Mama grasped Desiree’s hands and submerged them back under the water. The wooden spoon was in her other hand. The pain on Desiree’s neck brought tears to her eyes.

“I know it’s hard, Dezzy.” Mama said. “It’s always hard the first time, but you need to do this. Only dead hands can find a dead heart. A few more minutes, then you can move.”

Desiree nodded okay and Mama disappeared again. The minutes passed. The quiet ruffling of sheets as Mama finished setting up, then: “It’s time, sweetheart. You can move, now.”

Desiree got up, her legs stiff and her hands heavy. Her normally dark skin was ashen and lifeless.

Papa lay on the table, dead, and naked save for a washcloth over his eyes and a towel to hide his decency. Mama stood over him, the Special Knife gripped in both hands.

Mama beckoned to her, and Desiree went. She was scared, but everyone is scared at first. That’s what Uncle Amos had told her. Uncle Jasper and Aunt Lily, too.

Mama placed the Special Knife on the table and pulled a small hammer from the inside of her smock. She gently stroked the gray stubble on Papa’s cheek.

“Your Nana’s Mama called it the Heart Song. The beat.” Mama said, her fingers searching over Papa’s ribs. “It’s the strength of your life force. The first time I introduced Papa to your Nana, she was out of her skin with excitement. Said she could hear Papa’s Heart Song through the walls. Said he had good ribs. ‘Singing ribs’. Acoustics like a goshdarned opera house.’”

Mama’s finger settled on a rib just below the sternum. When she was certain of her choice she brought the hammer down hard. The chosen rib snapped like dry wood.

“The Heart Song keeps on after you die. Like a band that continues to play even though its conductor has left.” Mama smashed another rib.

“But it can’t be found with living hands. No, only dead hands can find a dead heart.”

Desiree watched as Mama made the incision between the smashed ribs, burying the Special Knife to the hilt and opening a glaring red mouth.

“Your father loved you, Dezzy. He would have wanted this.”

Mama guided Desiree’s cold hand into her father’s broken ribcage. The heat was intense, like a vice. She pushed through it, glancing off tissue and broken bone until she found what she was looking for: a knot. Her fingers wrapped around her father heart.

“I don’t feel it.” Desiree said, panicking. Had she done it wrong?

“Just wait, dear.” Mama said.

Desiree waited, her hand gripping the soft tissue. Then, she felt it. A beat.

“I feel it, Mama.” Desiree said. It was picking up, becoming stronger with each thrum.

“Pull.” Mama ordered.

It only took one tug to pry the organ free. Desiree pulled it out into the open air. The heart beat in her hand like palmed thunder. It made her mouth water.

“Your father’s heart was strong, dear. It has a lot to offer to you. Take it.”

Desiree’s hesitation evaporated. She tore into the heart greedily. The taste was intoxicating. Her father’s heart seemed to beat on her tongue, between her teeth.

Mama said something, but Desiree couldn’t hear her. All she could focus on was the taste, the hot blood, and in the back of her head, a high, singing chorus.

 

 

Timothy Rock

Tim resides in central Pennsylvania, on the cusp of obtaining his bachelor’s degree.

When he isn’t working at the bar or studying for law school, he writes, and he one day hopes to make something of it. His previous work can be found in the first issue if MYTHIC MAGAZINE.

The Black Spot

‘I judged our annual ghost story competition again today.  Some of the villagers claim I am not capable enough, or sane enough, to do this competently anymore.’

‘I disagree.  The third prize went to a story about a ship that disappears into the fog, second place to a tale about nocturnal comings and goings in a graveyard, while the winning entry featured the ghost of Blind Pew from Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island.’

‘The latter story won because its main character came to me last night – tap, tap, tap – warning if it didn’t win, I would receive the Black Spot.’

Brendan Joseph O'Dea

Brendan Joseph O’Dea lives and works in Leicestershire, U.K. He enjoys writing fiction and non-fiction in his spare time. He has published two books on Amazon Kindle and has recently started submitting short fiction to magazines. He has a preference for Gothic and traditional ghost stories which rely on atmosphere and strong characters.

Just A Dream

I dreamed about him again last night.

Every dream starts the same. I’m walking through thick forest. In the distance, someone is screaming. It’s not a scream of fear… It’s a scream of madness, from a mind totally unhinged.

I finally arrive at a clearing and see a man tied to a stake.

He’s screaming and thrashing around, unable to escape. His eyes, his insane eyes, are darting about, scanning the tree line.

He turns towards me, and I wake up.

Last night the dream ended differently…

I recognized his face…

It was my face…

That’s when I started screaming…

Andy Brown

Andy Brown is a professional musician who occasionally dips the smallest of his toes into the huge pool of writing…A horror, sci-fi and fantasy fan since he was a tiny child, he still loves the genres although he could in no way be described as “tiny” anymore…

Till You Do

“Go to sleep. Please, go to sleep. I can’t sleep till you do.”

There’s desperation in its voice.

“Go to sleep.”

I hear the possible threat hidden in its speech, but I’m unconcerned. This ghost beseeches, but does not haunt.

“I can’t sleep till you do.”

Good! Stay with me! Explain your strange request! I need to understand.

I can’t sleep till I do.

There’s desperation in my voice.

I wait for a face to rise beside me, but nothing ever comes.

So we stay silent, neither of us able to explain the needs we wish the other would satisfy.

P.J. Kryfko

P.J. Kryfko is a writer, producer, storyteller, daydreamer, and avid YouTube watcher (not always in that order). He has been published as a comic writer, prose writer, journalist, and in 2014 wrote and produced his first short film. His publishers include: Image Comics, Liars’ League NYC, Weirdpunk Books, the DFW Art & Words Show, and the Brooklyn Prose Bowl. AintitCoolNews.com calls his work “atypical and original.” His Mom calls him “Handsome.”

You can find out more about P.J. at his homepage.

Setting Self Doubt on Fire: Don’t Let Self-Doubt Make You Miss Deadlines

Hi All, I’m back with some more self-doubt fighting words.

So, what do I have for you today? Well, today, I will be talking about writing deadlines, and how self-doubt can get in your way of reaching them.

As a writer, especially when you’re starting out, it can be easy to spend years writing one short story and doing nothing else, simply because you don’t have a deadline. A deadline can help to motivate us to finish a piece and to send it out into the world. But even with a deadline, you can’t guarantee success, especially when Mr Self Doubt pops up to continue tormenting you.

How will Mr Self Doubt torment you? Well, he’ll make you doubt yourself and your work. You worry that you won’t have time to edit your story properly before submitting. You convince yourself that you shouldn’t be submitting anything right now. So what do you do? You miss the deadline, and what goes with it is a chance to be published. How do I know this? Well, I have missed many deadlines due to the fear of not being good enough.

So, what can you do to overcome this? Well, I have listed five ways you can stop self-doubt from making you miss a deadline:

  1. Don’t start work too close to the deadline – You want to give yourself enough time to write, and properly edit your story. While a close deadline can work for some, if you suffer from self-doubt, you’ll likely decide to hold a piece rather than submit it if you do it this way. For a short story, I would suggest that you give yourself at least a month to work on your story. If you can do longer, then that’s even better.
  2. Organise your time – to write and edit a short story you need time, which can be tricky to do when you have other commitments. So make sure you allocate some time each day to work on your story and stick to it.
  3. Aim to submit before the deadline – if you aim to submit your story earlier than the stated deadline, then you will have backup days to use if you need more time to work on your story.
  4. Don’t overload yourself – it can be tempting to plan to submit several stories per month, but it’s not ideal if you don’t have enough time to do that. So instead of trying to submit to multiple magazines and competitions at once, choose the submission calls that you want to do the most, and focus on those, so when the deadline is near you don’t fly into a panic. This is something I need to work on because I’m always trying to do too much.
  5. Ignore self-doubt and focus on the positives – you will find yourself plagued by self-doubt, but you need to remember that you won’t get published unless you push fear aside and take the leap. It’s scary, I know, especially when you fear rejection, but it’s worth trying so one day you can get that acceptance.

So there you have it – five tips to help you stop self-doubt from making you miss deadlines. So let’s do it, let’s beat Mr Self Doubt. Keep writing folks!

To end this post, here is another inspirational quote:

“Dreams without deadlines are dead in the water. Deadlines are really lifelines to achieving our goals.” ― Mark BattersonAll In: You Are One Decision Away From a Totally Different Life

Ongoing Submissions: Shoreline of Infinity

Payment: £10/1000 word

What we are looking for

First, we strongly suggest you read a copy of Shoreline of Infinity to see the kind of stories our readers like. You can download a copy or order a print copy over there on the right.

We are looking for a good science fiction story. Something that gives reality a tweak on the nose. An idea that makes us stop and think.

But more than that, we want your story to be populated with characters we want to meet and have a drink with or from whom we want to run screaming away; we want characters to hug to ease the pain; we want to read the stories of heroes; we want to be your character.

Make us want to nudge our sleeping partners at 3am in the morning and say: “you should read this!”

Broaden our horizons – look beyond the Shoreline.

We told you, we’re looking for a good story.

If you can include all that in one tale as seen through the powerful lens of science fiction, so much the better.

 Length

From Issue 8 onwards we will be publishing one story of up to 10,000 words, otherwise it’s a maximum of 5,000 words.

What we Offer and Rights

We offer £10/1000 word at the moment.

We retain the right to continue selling back issues of Shoreline of Infinity and Shoreline anthologies containing your story (royalties are paid for republishing in collections).

We buy first digital and print world rights in English, but your rights are returned to you after 6 months of original publication (digital or print), and you are free to publish how or wherever you like. However, it would be splendid if you could acknowledge first publication in Shoreline of Infinity.

What to Submit

We accept simultaneous submissions, but do tell us immediately if you want to withdraw a submission. Submit a neatly formatted manuscript set in Times 12 point and double spaced in Word format ( doc/docx). Please use the submission process here – emailed manuscripts will be ignored.

Submit only one story.

Response Time

We will reply as soon as we can after your submission, but do contact us if you have not heard within 3 months. We know what it’s like to be kept waiting, but we are only human (mostly).

submit

Via: Shoreline Of Infinity.

Taking Submissions: Southern Fried Autopsies

Deadline: October 31st, 2017
Payment: Contributor’s Copy

The goal of this anthology is to shout loud and proud that The South holds some of the best horror writers and authors. What’s unique about this project is that it will not only include a collection of shorts but also hold hand-picked dark poetry! We simply cannot limit an anthology of this nature to just short stories, though those are the main material that will be included.
 
Submissions for short stories need to be between 3,000-7,000 words in length.  Some considerations will be made for stories just over or just under, but those works will be chosen best on quality, blow our minds and attempt to scare us to death with your vivid imagery through words. We are wanting quality stories over word count.
 
This anthology’s target audience is an adult audience that is 18 years and above, so no children’s horror stories, please.
We also will not accept extreme erotica horror (mild adult scenes are fine as long as it pertains to the story’s forward projection or to display character traits), rape, bestiality, incest, pedophilia, or domestic violence.
 
This anthology is strictly for horror authors and writers that live in The South. It is not restricted to those that have moved to The South, imports are fine! 😉 This book is restricted for southern writers and authors at this time as the aim is to have southern authors and writers submit, but not limited to strictly to readers. If this has enough interest we can add a couple of future anthologies with other regional authors and writers in mind. I.E. an anthology featuring northern writers or just the east coast, for examples.
 
Submissions are currently open and must be sent to:
 
Please title the email: Southern Fried Autopsies Submission
Within the submission, in the document holding the writing, please include title, author’s name/pen name, also phone numbers, email address, and word count. Some of this information will be used to be able to contact you if accepted.
This anthology will be published by Burning Willow Press, LLC and will be edited, formatted, etc by the staff of Burning Willow Press. It’s a project funded by Burning Willow Press with a one-year holding of all works included before being open to publications elsewhere by the author, but Burning Willow Press will continue to republish this work as a whole anthology for the following 4 years afterward.
 
This project will be published out Halloween 31st, 2018, from this publication date forward, is when the stories will be locked, midnight Halloween 31st, 2019 the stories will be open for the authors to take their works elsewhere and do what they want, but Burning Willow Press will continue republishing it for the foreseeable 4 years.
 
This anthology is for exposure, contributor copy (whether it’s a physical copy or digital will be up to the contributor), and not a royalty share or advances. This is a partnership between L. Bachman, Jay Michael Wright II, and Burning Willow Press, LLC.
 
Submissions close Halloween 31st, 2017 at midnight.

Via: L. Bachman.

Taking Submissions: Untitled Rice Paper Press Horror Anthology

Deadline: May 31st, 2017
Payment: Up to $100 and a contributor’s copy

We are currently requesting submissions for a new horror anthology of short stories we plan to publish this year. We’re paying up to $100 per published story based on word count, AND a free printed version of the anthology.

 We are looking for edited, well-written, horror stories from 5K to 10K words in length.  Scare us so we can’t sleep at night!

 Your stories need to be previously unpublished – exceptions to this will be handled on a limited basis as long as you still retain all rights to the work.  We are looking for original content. If you have previously published your story to a blog or social media account, we will not be interested.

Please email your story to the address below and in the subject line and enter the words “Horror Anthology.” Then, copy and paste your story in the body of the email, do not attach files. If accepted, we will notify you and ask you to submit an MS Word document.

 Payment amount to be determined based on word count. We will discuss terms upon acceptance for publication.

Submissions will close midnight, May 31, 2017.

Other submissions are closed at this time.

Please send your submissions to:

Via: Rice Paper Press.

Taking Submissions: Heroic Fantasy Quarterly

Deadline: March 31, 2107
Payment: $100usd

Heroic Fantasy Quarterly is OPEN to submissions through March 31, 2107.

 

Heroic Fantasy Quarterly is open to FICTION submissions four months per year. The months you can submit are:

March

June

September

December

If you submit fiction in any other month, you will receive an auto-response and your tale will not be reviewed.

We remain open for POETRY submissions at all times, however, so keep those coming! If you get an auto-response, don’t worry — as long as you mention poetry in the subject line your work will be reviewed.

* * *

As its name suggests, Heroic Fantasy Quarterly is a quarterly ezine dedicated to publishing heroic fantasy — in both prose and poetry. We are unrepentant in our goal of elevating unapologetic sword and sorcery to a rightful high place. We pay $100 for stories and $25 for poems, upon publication.  (Scroll down for info on art submissions.) We purchase first world English language electronic rights, electronic rights for 90 days, archival rights for twelve months, and excerpt rights.

As of 7-31-2013, we will publish in August, November, February, and May. Each issue will include up to three stories and two poems. Our fiction word limit is 10,000 words, although we are willing to serialize at a maximum of 50,000 words over four issues. You may submit up to three poems, with a cumulative maximum of 30 pages.  Tolkienesque (as in really long) poetry epics/sagas/vedas will most likely be treated — and paid — like fiction. Similarly, prose pieces of fewer than 1,000 words will be paid at poetry’s standard rate of $25.

Art: HFQ is looking for quality banner art to accompany each new issue. Please review art from the past two issues to see the style we prefer. Image dimensions should be approximately 850 x 250 pixels. We’re not interested in non-banner art at this time. We’ll pay you, but rates are negotiable. If you’d like us to consider your work please email a link to the website where your art is displayed. DO NOT SEND US AN EMAIL WITH YOUR ART ATTACHED; WE WILL DELETE IT, AND YOU’LL NEVER KNOW IF WE EVEN GAVE YOU A LOOK! Follow our submission instructions below, but insert ART instead of fiction or poetry in the subject line of your email. We look forward to seeing what you’ve got!

Submission Method:

We accept submissions by email only.

Make sure the subject line of your email follows this formula:
Submission – [fiction or poetry] – [title] – [your last name].
For example: Submission – Fiction – Red Nails – Howard

IMPORTANT: do not send attachments unless we ask for them. Paste the first 10 pages of your story or poems into the body of your email — but don’t kill yourself trying to perfect the formatting. For queries, we can live without paragraph indentations and double-spaced lines. We do need to have a line between paragraphs, though. If your sample pages look like a huge block of text in your email program follow these steps:

  • Open a new blank document in your word processing program.
  • Copy and paste the first 10 pages of your story into the new document.
  • Open the “Find and Replace” function [ctl+h].
  • In the “Find What” box put  ^p
  • In the “Replace With” box put ^p^p
  • Click on the “Replace All” button.
  • The program will tell you how many replacements it made.  Click “OK”
  • Close the “Find and Replace” function box.
  • Copy and paste the new document’s text into your email program.

Feel free to include a paragraph introducing yourself and detailing your publishing history, and anything you think we need to know about your story. Or not. All we really care about is the quality of your yarn.

You have about five paragraphs to hook us and 10 pages to impress us — use them wisely.

Our email address is: editors [at] heroicfantasyquarterly.com
More Detail About Our Editorial Process

If you haven’t heard from us by the time a new issue publishes, don’t worry — you’re in the loop for the next issue.

If we like the cut of your story’s jib, we’ll contact you via email to ask for the rest of your work, which we’ll want as an RTF or Word attachment. At this point your odds of being published with us go way up (+3 modifier!). From that stack we buy and/or make rewrite requests. We try to offer constructive criticism on everything that is rejected from this second tier.

Other Submission-Related Stuff

Our response time is about 60 days.

If you’re curious as to what level of violence, sex and/or nudity is too much, just follow what you’d expect to see in movie ratings. We think an “R” rating is a suitable upper limit.

We consider reprints by invitation only. Our invitation — not yours!  Unless of course your name is Gene Wolfe or Michael Moorcock.

Things we shouldn’t even have to say, but just to cover the bases:

No fan fiction.  No thinly-veiled fan fiction.  No thinly-veiled real-life revenge fantasies (especially against your esteemed editors).

Bonus Modifiers
Three Words:  Heroic Fantasy Fiction
We are a Half-Orc positive venue
Action is an art, not a diversion
One word:  Visceral
Know your horses
Dwarves who don’t always win
Barbarians with feelings

Negative Modifiers
Barbarians with feeeeeeeeelings
Three words: Heroic Fantasy Parodies
Really exacting blow-by-blow combat scenes
Frequent or lengthy inner dialogue
Two words: Overly Descriptive
Stuff you obviously lifted from your D&D/White Wolf/Legend of Five Rings/Tunnels and Trolls (OMG!  Did anybody actually play T&T?) games
Any mention at all about playing Tunnels and Trolls
Your second tier submission is not in proper manuscript format
You let the “R” rating go to your head — violence and sex should augment the story, not be the story

July 1, 2010, addendum

After a year we’ve noticed some things that we feel we should call to your attention.  There are certain trends we have encountered, and certain truisms that we feel would make everyone’s life easier if we all knew them.   To wit:

Witty banter usually isn’t.

Stories that start in an inn are usually out.

Ditto for stories that start with a group of strangers meeting at an inn.

Ditto for stories that start with a group of strangers meeting at an inn and being hired to do a job by a mysterious individual who is clearly a sorcerer (or vampire, or sorcerer/vampire).

Double ditto for stories that start with a group of strangers meeting at an inn and being hired to do a job by a mysterious man who is clearly a sorcerer (or vampire, or sorcerer/vampire) who then turns on the very adventurers he/she/it hired only to be thwarted by the one dwarf in the party.  In fact, toss us a dwarf curveball.  So far we’ve never seen a story with a dwarf character where that character doesn’t kick ass from beginning to end.

We are not all that interested in stories with vampires.  We feel much the same re: zombies.

Neither are we terribly keen on pirates; just remove that word and your odds go up.

Keep the backstory under control and reasonable.  That really is one of the main differences between what we reject outright, what we ask for completes on, and what we end up accepting:  how the backstory is handled.

When taking your novel and making a short story out of part of it, try to make it look like it wasn’t clearly cut out of a novel. Your tale must stand on its own.

Along those lines, HFQ publishes short stories, not novels, so if you do hook us with a short from a novel we’ll only bend over backward so far to accommodate unnecessary exposition or backstory in the short story that relates to the novel.

In the past we’ve preferred secondary world settings, however after a year we are now more open to historical fantasy.

Thanks for considering these guidelines and pitfalls. We look forward to reading your work

Via: Heroic Fantasy Quarterly.

Ongoing Submissions: The Forge

Payment: $0.05/words up to 1,000 words, with a minimum payment of $25 and a maximum of $50

Our Process

The Forge Literary Magazine publishes one prose piece per week selected by a rotating cast of editors. Each submission is read anonymously by two editors. If a story is chosen to move forward, it is read by one of two rotating Editors of the Month who each make final decisions on the stories they receive. Since we are a diverse, international group of writers, our tastes and styles are wide-ranging. Read more about us here.

Try us!

 

Fiction and Nonfiction

We accept unsolicited submissions via Submittable. Again, since we read anonymously, please do not put your name anywhere in the file. We prefer stories below 3,000 words but will consider work of rare quality up to 5,000 words. We love flash and micro prose. Please send one previously unpublished piece per category and wait to hear from us before submitting another. Reprints are by solicitation only. Literary excellence is our only criteria. We are open to all genres and voices, and stories with any background, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual and personal identity from all over the world. We accept and encourage simultaneous submissions, but please withdraw promptly via Submittable if your piece is accepted elsewhere. Please do not inquire about the status of your submission until three months has passed. If you are a former contributor, please wait at least six months before you submit again; we only publish one piece per contributor per year.

Sorry, poets. We admire what you do but sadly, we only read prose for the time being.

 

Payment and Rights

We pay, upon publication, $0.05/words up to 1,000 words, with a minimum payment of $25 and a maximum of $50. We request exclusive worldwide English language rights to publish in the Forge Literary Magazine, an online journal, for a period of three months, after which all rights revert to the author. Authors outside the U.S. must be able to receive payment via Paypal.

Ready? Go!

 

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Via: Forge Lit Magazine.

Ongoing Submissions: Conduit

Payment: Contributor’s Copy

Conduit is looking for previously unpublished poetry and prose that demonstrates originality, intelligence, courage, irreverence, and humanity. Please send 3-5 poems or 1 prose piece (up to 3500 words). Include a self-addressed stamped envelope. All manuscripts will be recycled unless appropriate postage is included for return. Reporting time is 9 weeks to 9 months. Payment in copies.

These titles are primarily for our own amusement. Submissions are evaluated at the nexus of their merit and our taste, rather than whether or not they match any theme. If you haven’t seen or read Conduit before, we recommend you sample our mad concoction before submitting.

If another journal has seduced you with promises of fame and glory, please notify us immediately to withdraw your submission, including the date the piece was submitted.

PLEASE NOTE

We do not accept online submissions.
All electronic submissions will be destroyed pronto. All correspondence is subject to publication, in whole or in part. Send submissions to:

CONDUIT    |    788 OSCEOLA AVENUE    |    SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA 55105

Via: Conduit.

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