Recent Places To Submit

Ongoing Submissions: Strange Constellations

| January 23, 2015 | 0 Comments

Ongoing Periods: July 1 to August 31, and again from January 1 to February 28
Payment: $30 per story

What we’re looking for:

Short fiction between 3000-7500 words. This length is flexible.

Speculative fiction. We especially like science fiction and fantasy but will read anything that grips us.

Submit completed manuscripts to submissions AT asterismpress DOT com. Rich text format (.rtf) preferred, but we’re not here to tell you which word processor to use. Use the subject line ‘SUBMISSION: (Your title)’ for best results.

We purchase nonexclusive electronic and anthology rights, and the right to distribute the material under a Creative Commons license (CC-BY-NC 4.0). We accept reprints (though please indicate where it has appeared previously, if feasible), but would rather avoid simultaneous submissions (it just sounds like a headache for everyone involved). If we accept your story, we’ll pay you a flat rate of $30. Please bear in mind that most publishers will not buy reprints, so don’t send us anything you’d like to sell later.

Strange Constellations is open to submissions from July 1 to August 31, and again from January 1 to February 28. We try to respond to all submissions within 30 days.

HWA Announces Jack Ketchum and Tanith Lee as 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award Winners

| January 23, 2015 | 3 Comments

hwa

The Horror Writers Association (HWA), the premier organization of writers and publishers of horror and dark fantasy and home of the iconic Bram Stoker Awards®, today announced Jack Ketchum and Tanith Lee as the 2015 recipients of the Bram Stoker Award® for Lifetime Achievement. The HWA presents the award annually to individuals whose work has substantially influenced the horror genre. While the award is often presented to a writer, it may also be given for influential accomplishments in other creative fields.

“We had a wealth of very worthy candidates for this award,” said John R. Little, jury chairperson of the Lifetime Achievement Award (LAA) committee. “After much discussion, we believe we agreed on two exceptional winners this year.”

Jack Ketchum has been one of the premiere authors in the horror field for many years. His novel The Girl Next Door is considered a classic, but he’s written many other equally deeply moving works. Ketchum has won the Bram Stoker Award® four times and been nominated an additional three times, showing the broad appeal to his audience. He was named the Grandmaster at the 2011 World Horror Convention.

Tanith Lee has written more than ninety novels in various fields, including horror, fantasy, and science fiction. She is very popular regardless of the genre she chooses to write in. She has won several World Fantasy and British Fantasy Awards, and in 2013 was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the World Fantasy Convention.

“Jack and Tanith remain extremely popular authors today,” said HWA President Lisa Morton, “and the Horror Writers Association is proud to bestow the Lifetime Achievement Award on them.”

Ketchum will be on-hand to accept the award (Lee will accept via video), on the evening of Saturday, May 9, 2015 as part of a gala banquet and the presentation of the Bram Stoker Awards during the World Horror Convention in Atlanta, Georgia. Tickets to the banquet and the convention are on sale to the public at http://www.whc2015.org. The awards presentation will also be live-streamed online for those who cannot attend in person.

The 2015 Lifetime Achievement Committee was chaired by John R Little, and included Maria Alexander, Patrick Freivald, Aaron Sterns and Heather Graham. For more information on the Bram Stoker Awards presentation and the 2015 World Horror Convention, please visit http://www.whc2015.org.

THE HORROR WRITERS ASSOCIATION is a nonprofit organization of writers and publishing professionals around the world, dedicated to promoting dark literature and the interests of those who write it. The HWA formed in 1985 with the help of many of the field’s greats, including Dean Koontz, Robert McCammon, and Joe Lansdale. Today, with over 1250 members around the globe, it is the oldest and most respected professional organization for the much-loved writers who have brought you the most enjoyable sleepless nights of your life.

One of HWA’s missions is to encourage public interest in and foster an appreciation of good Horror and Dark Fantasy literature. The organization offers public areas of its site, www.horror.org; sponsors or takes part in public readings and lectures; publishes a monthly newsletter for members; maintains outreach to booksellers, librarians, fans and readers; facilitates readings and signings by horror writers; offers scholarships; and maintains an official presence at the major fan-based horror and fantasy conventions, such as the World Horror Convention, and literary festivals.

For more information on the HWA, please visit www.Horror.org

Taking Submissions: Allegory Magazine Volume 27 54

| January 22, 2015 | 1 Comment

allegory

Deadline: February 28th, 2015
Payment: $15 per story

FORMATTING GUIDELINES

This is proving to be a recurring problem, so we’re putting it up front. Please, for all our sakes, read this next part carefully.

All submissions should be sent by e-mail (no letters or telephone calls please) tosubmissions@allegoryezine.com. Below are some formatting rules to help us process your submission more quickly.

Email and Cover Letters

Email is accepted in both text and HTML formats. When submitting, please put this in the subject line:

Submission: (Title) – (First and Last name)

Include the following in the body of the email and in the attached submission:

Your name
Name to use on the story (byline), if different
Your preferred email address
Your mailing address
The story’s title
The story’s word count

You may also include a cover letter in the body of the email. We get a lot of strange stuff in cover letters, so if you’re unsure of what goes in them (and especially what doesn’t) please refer to these cover letter tips:

How to write a cover letter | What not to put in a cover letter by Jed Hartman

Submission Formatting

We ONLY accept submissions as attachments!

All stories submitted as an attachment must follow standard manuscript formatting. We will no longer read any story not properly formatted. (And we much prefer Courier New to Times New Roman) For explanations and tips on what SMF is and how to do it with word processing programs, please see this article.

Please send your submission as an attachment in Microsoft Word (DOC, DOCX) orRich Test Format (RTF) only. Other formats, such as Works, WordPerfect, Open Office, etc., have proven difficult to open.

Please note that we no longer accept “inline” submssions – that is: submissions with the stories pasted directly into the body of the email.

Fiction Guidelines

We’re looking for good, solid fiction. We specialize in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror genres. We will consider other genres, such as humor or general interest, provided that the work possesses an original, “quirky” slant in the Northern Exposure, Ally McBeal vein.

Here are some basic “do’s” and “don’ts”.

DO give us strong characters and good plotting. DO put clever, but logical twists on the end of your tales. DO experiment with new ideas and unusual writing styles, but without falling into traps of contrivance and cliché.

DON’T submit any stories based on movies, television or any printed media not your own. DON’T submit reprints without including the name of the publication in which the work first appeared, along with the date of publication. DON’T send more than one story in the same submission.

There is no minimum or maximum length for fiction. But bear in mind that short-shorts (less than 500 words) and flash fiction (less than 100 words) are usually hard sells for us, as are stories longer than 5000 words. We’ll consider them, but they will have to be exceptional.

We pay a flat rate of $15 (U.S. dollars) for each story.

Payment is made upon publication, either by PayPal or personal check, based on the author’s wishes.

General Stuff

We publish tri-annually, on the first of January, May and September. The order in which stories and articles appear on the site is solely arbitrary and should not be construed in any other way. All works that are accepted for publication remain on the site for the full four months. With the publication of the subsequent issue, all rights to the works previously displayed revert to the author. We buy First World Rights and World Reprint Rights. Bylines are most certainly given.

Most submissions are reviewed within 4-6 weeks. If the story shows merit, we will respond with a “maybe” letter, explaining that the submission is in the running for a spot in the next issue. At the end of the submission cycle, which is always two months before the next issue comes out, all “maybe” submission are re-reviewed, and the top eight selected for publication. At that time, all accepted authors receive contracts to sign. Since these contracts and, later, the payment checks, go out by snail mail, it is VERY important that all submissions include a snail mail address.

We don’t “buy ahead”. By that, we mean that ALLEGORY purchases only the stories it needs for the current issue, rather than stocking up for the next and the next. This means that every author who received an acceptance from us will see their work on this site with the next new issue.

Simultaneous submissions are “OK”, provided that you let us know at the time of submission that other editors are reviewing this work.

That’s about it. Good luck.

Ty Drago
Editors
Allegory

Via: Allegory Magazine.

Taking Submissions: Mental Ward: Experiments (Re-Opened)

| January 21, 2015 | 0 Comments

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Deadline: March 1, 2015
Payment: $25 per story selected for inclusion.

The elevator doors open, the lights are flickering, the gurney is wheeled into a dank, dimly-lit hallway well below ground. Does the Doctor have the patient’s best interests at heart, or is something more nefarious going on? How does the staff figure out what treatments are most effective and which are not?

In our other two Mental Ward collections, we asked you to tell us what happened above ground in the institute itself; what memories of the past were trapped in the abandoned hallways; now we’re asking you to tell us what goes on behind closed doors. The secret experiments that are feared and whispered about among the patients. Tell us what unthinkable things greed, the corruption of power, and the desire to be remembered will drive a Doctor to do to the unfortunate patients left in their care.

Tell your tale from whoever’s perspective you’d like, just make sure the story you tell is a depraved one.

Note: This is a reopened anthology. Your story must contain the following three elements to be considered:

Your story must take place in a Mental Asylum or Institution.
Your story must involve individuals from the Asylum: doctors, nurses, patients, maintenance staff, etc.
Your story must contain what would be considered an inhumane experiment that is physically performed.

Submission Deadline: March 1, 2015

Word Count: minimum 4,000 words; maximum: 8,000 words.

Payment: $25 per story selected for inclusion.

Copyright: First time worldwide copyright for a period of one year after publication.

Reprints will NOT be considered.

Anthology Submission guidelines:
Submission Deadline – March 1, 2015
Word Count: 4,000 – 8,000 words.

Payment: $25 per story selected for inclusion.

Copyright: First time worldwide copyright for a period of one year after publication.

Reprints will NOT be considered.

Graphic gore must be kept to a minimum unless it is integral to the story; absolutely no pedophilia, human bestiality or overtly descriptive and graphic rape scenes will be considered.

Only stories previously unpublished may be submitted. Upon acceptance into the anthology, you agree that Sirens Call Publications holds exclusive publishing rights for twelve (12) months from the date of publication; after that date has passed, all intellectual property rights revert to the author with the proviso that Sirens Call Publications retains distribution rights in the format of the contracted anthology.

Formatting – all submissions should be sent as .doc or .docx files formatted as follows: Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, single line spacing, first line indent. Italicize what you would like italicized, bold what you would like bolded. We will not interpret formating as anything other than it appears in the submitted document. Dialogue requires quotes ( ” ), inner thought should be italicized, and spoken or rememberd quotes should be encapsulated in single ticks ( ‘ ). If there is any question about formatting, please contact our editor through the submission email address. submissions@sirenscallpublications.com

An eBook copy will be sent to all contributors and up to 5 paperback copies per author will be available to purchase at cost plus shipping.

Email your submission as an attachment to: submissions@SirensCallPublications.com

Submissions are to be directed to our submissions email address only. The subject line should contain: “SUBMISSION – MW Experiments – ‘your story title’” or your submission will not be considered for this anthology.

2014 Bram Stoker Awards® Preliminary Ballot Announced

| January 21, 2015 | 7 Comments

hwa

The Horror Writers Association (HWA) is pleased to announce the Preliminary Ballots for the 2014 Bram Stoker Awards®. The HWA is the premiere writers organization in the horror and dark fiction genre, with over 1,300 members. We have presented the Bram Stoker Awards® in various categories since 1987 (see http://www.horror.org/stokers.htm).

The HWA Board and the Bram Stoker Awards Committee congratulate all those appearing on these Preliminary Ballots. Notes about the voting process appear after the ballot listing.

The Preliminary Ballots are:

Superior Achievement in a Novel
Tim Burke – The Flesh Sutra (NobleFusion Press)
Adam Christopher – The Burning Dark (Tor Books)
Michaelbrent Collings – This Darkness Light (self-published)
Lawrence C. Connolly – Vortex (Fantasist Enterprises)
Craig DiLouie – Suffer the Children (Gallery Books of Simon & Schuster)
Patrick Freivald – Jade Sky (JournalStone)
Chuck Palahniuk – Beautiful You (Jonathan Cape, Vintage/Penguin Random House UK)
Christopher Rice – The Vines (47North)
Brett J. Talley – The Reborn (JournalStone)
Steve Rasnic Tem – Blood Kin (Solaris Books)

Superior Achievement in a First Novel
Maria Alexander – Mr. Wicker (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
J.D. Barker – Forsaken (Hampton Creek Press)
Janice Gable Bashman – Predator (Month9Books)
David Cronenberg – Consumed (Scribner)
Michael Knost – Return of the Mothman (Woodland Press)
Daniel Levine – Hyde (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
Josh Malerman – Bird Box (Harper Collins)
Whitney Miller – The Violet Hour (Flux)
Chantal Noordeloos – Angel Manor (Horrific Tales Publishing)
C.J. Waller – Predator X (Severed Press)

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel
Ari Berk – Lych Way (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)
Jake Bible – Intentional Haunting (Permuted Press)
Ilsa J. Bick – White Space (Egmont)
John Dixon – Phoenix Island (Simon & Schuster/Gallery Books)
Kami Garcia – Unmarked (The Legion Series Book 2) (Little Brown Books for Young Readers)
S.E. Green – Killer Instinct (Simon & Schuster/Simon Pulse)
Tonya Hurley – Passionaries (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Micol Ostow – Amity (Egmont)
Peter Adam Salomon – All Those Broken Angels (Flux)
Sam Swanson and Araminta Star Matthews – Horror High School: Return of the Loving Dead (Curiosity Quills Press)
Johnny Worthen – Eleanor: Book 1 (The Unseen) (Jolly Fish Press)

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel
Charles Burns – Sugar Skull
Emily Carroll – Through the Woods
Victor Gischler – Kiss Me Satan
Joe Hill – Locke and Key, Vol. 6
Joe R. Lansdale and Daniele Serra – I Tell You It’s Love (Short, Scary Tales Publications)
Jonathan Maberry – Bad Blood (Dark Horse Books)
Paul Tobin – The Witcher

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction
Michael Bailey – Dandelion Clocks (Inkblots and Blood Spots) (Villipede Publications)
Taylor Grant – The Infected (Cemetery Dance #71) (Cemetery Dance)
Eric J. Guignard – Dreams of a Little Suicide (Hell Comes To Hollywood II: Twenty-Two More Tales Of Tinseltown Terror (Volume 2)) (Big Time Books)
Kate Jonez – Ceremony of Flies (DarkFuse)
Joe R. Lansdale – Fishing for Dinosaurs (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Jonathan Maberry – Three Guys Walk Into a Bar (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Joe McKinney – Lost and Found (Limbus, Inc., Book II) (JournalStone)
Gene O’Neill – Ridin the Dawg (Mia Moja) (Thunderstorm Books)
John F.D. Taff – The Long Long Breakdown (The End in all Beginnings) (Grey Matter Press)
Gregor Xane – The Riggle Twins (Bad Apples) (Corpus Press)

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction
Dale Bailey – Sleep Paralysis (Nightmare Magazine, April 2014) (Nightmare)
Hal Bodner – Hot Tub (Hell Comes to Hollywood II) (Big Time Books)
Patrick Freivald – Trigger Warning (Demonic Visions Book 4) (Chris Robertson)
Sydney Leigh – Baby’s Breath (Bugs: Tales That Slither, Creep, and Crawl) (Great Old Ones Publishing)
Usman T. Malik – The Vaporization Enthalpy of a Peculiar Pakistani Family (Qualia Nous) (Written Backwards)
Alessandro Manzetti – Nature’s Oddities (The Shaman: And Other Shadows) (self-published)
Rena Mason – Ruminations (Qualia Nous) (Written Backwards)
John Palisano – Splinterette (Widowmakers: A Benefit Anthology of Dark Fiction)
Sayuri Ueda – The Street of Fruiting Bodies (Phantasm Japan) (Haikasoru, an imprint of VIZ Media, LLC)
Genevieve Valentine – A Dweller in Amenty (Nightmare Magazine, March 2014) (Nightmare)
Damien Angelica Walters – The Floating Girls: A Documentary (Jamais Vu, Issue Three) (Post Mortem Press)

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection
Michael Bailey – Inkblots and Blood Spots (Villipede Publications)
Stephen Graham Jones – After the People Lights Have Gone Off (Dark House Press)
John R. Little – Little by Little (Bad Moon Books)
Helen Marshall – Gifts for the One Who Comes After (ChiZine Publications)
David Sakmyster – Escape Plans (Wordfire Press)
Terrence Scott – The Madeleine Wheel: Playing with Spiders (Amazon)
Lucy Snyder – Soft Apocalypses (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
Robin Spriggs – The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom (Anomalous Books)
John F.D. Taff – The End In All Beginnings (Grey Matter Press)
Alexander Zelenyj – Songs for the Lost (Eibonvale Press)

Superior Achievement in an Anthology
John Joseph Adams and Hugh Howey – The End Is Nigh (Broad Reach Publishing)
Michael Bailey – Qualia Nous (Written Backwards)
Jason Brock – A Darke Phantastique (Cycatrix Press)
Ellen Datlow – Fearful Symmetries (ChiZine Publications)
Kate Jonez – Halloween Tales (Omnium Gatherum)
Eric Miller – Hell Comes to Hollywood II (Big Time Books)
Chuck Palahniuk, Richard Thomas, and Dennis Widmyer – Burnt Tongues (Medallion Press)
Brian M. Sammons – The Dark Rites of Cthulhu (April Moon Books)
Brett J. Talley – Limbus, Inc., Book II (JournalStone)
Terry M. West – Journals of Horror: Found Fiction (Pleasant Storm Entertainment)

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay
Scott M. Gimple – The Walking Dead: The Grove, episode 4:14 (AMC)
James Hawes – Penny Dreadful: Possession (Desert Wolf Productions/Neal Street Productions)
Jennifer Kent – The Babadook (Causeway Films)
Alex Kurtzman and Mark Goffman – Sleepy Hollow: “Bad Blood” (Sketch Films/K/O Paper Products/20th Century Fox Television)
John Logan – Penny Dreadful: Séance (Desert Wolf Productions/Neal Street Productions)
Greg Mclean and Aaron Sterns – Wolf Creek 2 (Emu Creek Pictures)
Stephen Moffat – Doctor Who: Listen (British Broadcasting Corporation)
Cameron Porsendah – Helix: Pilot (Tall Ship Productions/Kaji Productions/Muse Entertainment/Lynda Obst Productions/in association with Sony Pictures Television)
Jack Thomas Smith –Infliction (Fox Trail Productions)
James Wong – American Horror Story: Coven: “The Magical Delights of Stevie Nicks” (FX Network)

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction
Massimo Berruti, S.T. Joshi, and Sam Gafford – William Hope Hodgson: Voices from the Borderland (Hippocampus Press)
Jason V. Brock – Disorders of Magnitude (Rowman & Littlefield)
Hayley Campbell – The Art of Neil Gaiman (HarperCollins Publishers)
S.T. Joshi – Lovecraft and A World in Transition (Hippocampus Press)
Leslie S. Klinger – The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (Liveright Publishing Corp., a division of W.W. Norton & Co.)
Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley – Horror 101: The Way Forward (Crystal Lake Publishing)
Robert Damon Schneck – Mrs. Wakeman vs. the Antichrist (Tarcher/Penguin)
Lucy Snyder – Shooting Yourself in the Head For Fun and Profit: A Writer’s Survival Guide (Post Mortem Press)
Tom Weaver, David Schecter, and Steve Kronenberg – The Creature Chronicles: Exploring the Black Lagoon Trilogy (McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers)

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection
Robert Payne Cabeen – Fearworms: Selected Poems (Fanboy Comics)
G.O. Clark – Gravedigger’s Dance (Dark Renaissance Books)
David E. Cowen – The Madness of Empty Spaces (Weasel Press)
Corrinne De Winter and Alessandro Manzetti – Venus Intervention (Kipple Officina Libraria)
Wade German – Dreams from the Black Nebula (Hippocampus Press)
Tom Piccirilli – Forgiving Judas (Crossroad Press)
Michelle Scalise – The Manufacturer of Sorrow (Eldritch Press)
Marge Simon and Mary Turzillo – Sweet Poison (Dark Renaissance Books)
Tiffany Tang – Creepy Little Death Poems (Dreality Press)
Stephanie Wytovich – Mourning Jewelry (Raw Dog Screaming Press)

Starting on February 1, our voting members will vote on these Preliminary Ballots, with voting closing on February 15 (only Active and Lifetime Members are eligible to vote).

Works appearing on the Preliminary Ballot are NOT “Bram Stoker Award nominees” and authors, editors, publishers, and others should not refer to any of these works as such – doing so is a severe breach of etiquette – voting members tend to notice such breaches and may consider them when determining which works to vote for on the Ballot.

The Preliminary Ballot will be sent to Lifetime and Active Members on February 1. If you are an Active or Lifetime Member and do NOT receive your electronic Ballot link by February 2, please first check your spam/junk mail filter and then email admin@horror.org. Note that Ballots are sent to the same email address as the Newsletter and the Internet Mailer. It is the responsibility of Members to keep their email address up to date by advising the administrator of any changes at admin@horror.org. Late Ballots cannot be accepted under any circumstances.

If your work (you are the author, agent, editor, publisher, or publicist) appears on the ballot and you wish to provide a link allowing Voting Members to read the work there will be a SPECIAL PRELIMINARY BALLOT INTERNET MAILER issued on or about January 20. Please email the Internet Mailer editor at imailer@horror.org with the details as soon as you can but no later than January 19 (links will not be accepted for this Special IM after January 19). You may offer to send electronic copies; provide reading copies on a website; or physical copies. Anyone validly representing a work appearing on the Preliminary Ballot may submit via this method, whether or not they are HWA members (this includes the author, agent, editor, publisher or publicist of the work).

Do NOT spam Voting Members, this is a severe breach of etiquette – Active and Lifetime (voting) members tend to notice such breaches and may consider them when determining which works to vote for on the Ballot.

You may also post the fact that your work is available to be read for Bram Stoker Award consideration ONCE, and only once, here: http://www.horror.org/private/smf/index.php?board=12.0 (Bram Stoker Eligible Work). If you had already posted your work here prior to the announcement of the Preliminary Ballot you ARE entitled to post it again. Note: Only members may post at this Forum but members are encouraged to post on behalf of non-members who may appear on the Ballot.

The Final Ballot (Bram Stoker Award nominees for 2014 calendar year) will be announced on February 23.

Via: Horror Writer’s Association.

Taking Submissions: 13

| January 20, 2015 | 0 Comments

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Deadline: April 30th, 2015
Payment: Contributor’s Copy

Submission Guidelines
What are we looking for? We seek Dark Art Material. We use that term in a general reference towards, horror, supernatural, paranormal, dark fantasy, and horror erotica. We are looking for authors who are looking to independently publish their novel outside the traditional publishing systems.

In addition to novel and novella length fiction, we also seek short fiction for horror anthologies.

Short Fiction Submissions

Guidelines:
Our normal open submission period for short fiction varies on anthology and dark art genre.

“13”
– We are looking for 13 horror stories, all some way loosely around using the number 13 in a significant way. Be creative, make it interesting. We want to see what you can come up with.
DEADLINE: April 31st, 2015

Short Fiction submitted to be apart of our anthologies must be between 1,000 to 15,000 words. We pay in contributor copies.

We only accept email submissions. Please ensure that they are in .doc, .docx, .pdf, or .rtf formats. Submissions can be emailed to submit@breakingfatepublishing.com. Please when emailing a submission, to please include a short cover email with synopsis, and a brief bio (including previous publication credits, if any).

In the subject line of the email, please include the title of the anthology you would like to be included. If not included in the subject, submissions may be lost or confused with other anthologies.

Via: Breaking Fate Publishing.

Taking Submissions: Electric Spec – May Edition

| January 19, 2015 | 1 Comment

electric-spec

Deadline: April 15th, 2015
Payment: $20 for each story published

A note on our editorial policy: before publication we may edit the story for length or readability. However, we always remain true to the spirit of the story.

Issues are published at the end of February, May, August, and November.

We have reading periods for each issue, though we never close to submissions.

May closes April 15

Please do not submit the same story more than once, and please submit only one story at a time.

We consider any story between 250 and 7000 words with speculative fiction elements. We prefer science fiction, fantasy, and the macabre, but we’re willing to push the limits of traditional forms of these genres.

We do not consider poetry, stories with over-the-top sex or violence, serials, novels, fan fiction, or non-fiction. We don’t accept multiple submissions; in other words, only submit one story at a time and wait for a response before submitting another. We accept simultaneous submissions as long as you let us know up front and tell us as soon as it’s accepted elsewhere. We do not publish reprints, including anything that has appeared on a website.

We pay $20 for each story we publish. We buy first-printing world exclusive rights for four months. Payment will be made shortly after publication using PayPal. We encourage our authors to establish a PayPal account if they don’t already have one.

We prefer to read submissions in traditional manuscript format. This means indented paragraphs instead of left justification, and Courier or Times New Roman font in 12 pt, double-spaced. Also, please include the title, your name, address, and word length on the first page of your story.

To submit your story to Electric Spec, e-mail it as an attachment in Rich Text Format (RTF) to submissions at electricspec (dot) com. Use the following subject line: SUBMISSION:Story Title by Author’s Name (Word Count). In the body of the e-mail, include writing credits, if any, and the word count of the story. With the proliferation of viruses on the Internet, we do not open attachments unaccompanied by a cover letter.

We respond to most submissions within six weeks. Because we are a quarterly magazine, it may take us up to three months to make a final decision, but we will let you know if your story is being held for voting.

If you want to withdraw a story from consideration, please e-mail us at submissions at electricspec (dot) com and include the word WITHDRAW in the subject line. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail us at our submissions address and include the word QUERY in the subject line.

Via: Electric Spec

Taking Submissions: The Tomato Anthology

| January 18, 2015 | 2 Comments

TomatoBar

Deadline: February 1st, 2015
Payment: Under 3k – $10, over 3k – $20. Miscellaneous pieces (artwork, recipes, poetry of at least a page) – $5. Haiku – $1 each.

We want your tomatoes.

Well, not literally. We want your tomato stories. Yes, you read that right. Stories about tomatoes. And poetry. And recipes. And artwork.

Ink Monkey and Amoeba Ink are joining together to create an anthology dedicated to the fruit/vegetable. And we need you.

Guidelines:

Tomatoes MUST play a large part in your piece. No, it doesn’t have to be an ode to your love (or hate) of the tomato, but you have to include them somehow in your story. If we can’t find the tomato reference, we won’t take your story, no matter how good it is.

Stories must be under 7500 words. If you have a piece that is longer, query first. Any genre will be considered. Remember the tomato.

We will also accept poetry of any length, original recipes, and artwork. The artwork must be reproducible in black and white. We have a cover artist, so don’t even ask.

Stories must be PG-13 or milder. We will consider some language and slight violence, so long as it is important to the story.

Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, Fried Green Tomatoes, Veggie Tales, and Ratatouille have been done before. Be original.

Payment and release:

We plan to release this anthology at the Tomato Arts Festival in East Nashville, TN, in summer of 2015. A Kickstarter campaign will launch before that.

Story authors will be paid as follows: Under 3k – $10, over 3k – $20. Miscellaneous pieces (artwork, recipes, poetry of at least a page) – $5. Haiku – $1 each.

In the event of a successful Kickstarter campaign, we will increase these payment amounts.

Contributors will also be able to purchase contributor copies at a discount.

OPEN SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE FEBRUARY 1, 2015, via the submittable form.
No exceptions to the deadline.

The anthology officially releases August 7, 2015.

SUBMIT HERE

Via:Amoeba Ink.

Setting Self Doubt on Fire: The benefits of organizing

| January 17, 2015 | 0 Comments

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Hello everyone! I hope all of your 2015 objectives are going well so far, but for those who don’t or are struggling to find motivation, I may have the solution for you.

After a slow start to January, I was unsure about which direction I should head in with my short stories. I had stories that I needed to submit, re-edit, edit, type up, and to write, and looking at my spreadsheet there was no clear path. When work is scattered like this it can be difficult to keep track of what you’re doing, so I decided that my spreadsheet needed a little spring cleaning. So what did I do?

  • I used a spreadsheet. If you don’t have a short story spreadsheet you should consider using one, it can help you keep track of what stage your story is at.
  • I then organized my spreadsheet into groups: draft, editing, re-editing, rejected submitting elsewhere, finished, submitted, planned, and on another spreadsheet I listed all of my published stories. Each section was colour coded, so it was easy to see what’s what at a glance.
  • I then put my groups in order of importance. For me, my submitted stories are the most important so those were moved to the top of the spreadsheet. I then added the other groups in the following order completed stories, rejected submitting elsewhere, rejected re-editing, editing, draft not typed, and planned.

With everything in order, I am now able to clearly see what stage each story is at and what I need to do. However, this isn’t the only benefit of organizing your spreadsheet. Organizing your spreadsheet can:

  • Allow you to see how much work you have done, so that you know you’re not wasting your time. This can help to keep you motivated, especially when you feel you’re not getting very far.
  • Help you to easily plan your next steps without having to tirelessly scroll up and down your spreadsheet. For example, all of my submitted stories are at the top rather than mixed up with the others. So if I need to check my submitted stories, I will only need to scroll to the top of the spreadsheet.
  • Help you to prioritise your work. You can easily see the stories you have neglected, and so you can decide which ones require your attention, and which ones can wait a little longer.

So if you are struggling to find motivation, or plan your next move then why not try reorganizing your spreadsheet. It worked for me; it could work for you.

To end this post, here is another inspirational quote:

“When defeat comes, accept it as a signal that your plans are not sound, rebuild those plans, and set sail once more toward your coveted goal.” – Napoleon Hill

 

Taking Submissions: The Journal of Unlikely Academia

| January 16, 2015 | 0 Comments

unlikely-story

Deadline: March 1, 2015
Payment: 6¢ per word

For this issue, rather than limiting ourselves to one specialized field of study, we’re looking for stories about the act of studying and learning itself. This could be anything from stories set in unusual schools like Hogwarts, Brakebills, and the Unseen University, to stories focusing on the students and faculty of unorthodox majors like Decision Sciences, Theme Park Engineering, and Bowling Industry Management and Technology (these are all real majors offered by real universities), to tales of researchers digging deep into forbidden tomes, to fictionalized scholarly articles on the Ethics of Motorcycle Taming or the Alternate History of Space Flight in the Mongol Empire. (Yes, we realize this opens us up to stories with footnotes, and we’ll probably kick ourselves later, but we’re brave souls.) We would not be dismayed to see stories that delve into epistemology and hermeneutics, into the nature and limits of knowledge itself.

As always, we want gorgeously-told tales, gripping characters, and unique worlds to explore. Genre doesn’t matter to us, along as your tale involves schools, studying, or academia in some integral way. For the sake of setting this issue apart from our recurring entomology and cryptography issues, we’d prefer not to receive stories involving the study of bugs/insects, or computing/code.

Word limit:

We’ll consider stories up to 8000 words, but strongly prefer stories of 5000 words or less. We’re open to flash fiction and fiction in non-traditional formats, but we do not publish poetry or non-fiction.

Pay rate:

We pay 6¢ per word for original fiction. Payment is made upon publication.

Rights:

We buy first-printing world exclusive English-language rights for six months after publication, and non-exclusive electronic rights for twelve months after publication. We hope (but do not require) that you’ll allow us to post the story in our archives indefinitely, but you have the right to ask us to remove your story from the archives at any time after twelve months. We also buy the option to non-exclusive anthology rights related to the magazine, as collected issues and/or a best-of anthology. Should we choose to include your story in a print and/or ebook anthology, you will receive a copy of the anthology.

Reprints:

Starting with Issue 11, we will no longer consider unsolicited reprints.

Simultaneous submissions:

No.

Multiple submissions:

No.

Submission Format:

Please send us your story in something generally conforming to Standard Manuscript Format. We’re not slavish to receiving everything formatted exactly the same way, but it’s generally not a good plan to annoy the editors before they’ve even started reading. You can find specific guidelines on what constitutes Standard Manuscript Format online, but the basics that we care about are:

  • 12 point courier, times new roman, or other reasonable font
  • double spaced
  • standard 1″ margins
  • top left of first page: name, contact info, word count
  • header: last name, title, page number

Please resist the temptation of creative formatting, fancy fonts, and butterfly clip art.

How to Submit:

Electronic submissions only. Send your story as a .doc or .rtf attachment to jue.submissions@gmail.com. The subject of the email should be:
“[ISSUE] SUBMISSION – [last-name] – [title].”

So for Jayne Smith submitting My Great Story to The Journal of Unlikely Entomology, it would look like “ENTOMOLOGY SUBMISSION — Smith — My Great Story,” but if it was going to theCryptography issue, it would be “CRYPTOGRAPHY SUBMISSION — Smith — My Great Story.”

Please include a brief cover letter in the body of the email with your name, contact information, story title, and word count. Feel free to tell us other stuff if you want, but please don’t include a summary of your story.

Response Times:

We will send an acknowledgement of receipt within 72 hours. If you do not receive this, please query. Average response time is fairly quick, but we’ll definitely get back to you within 4 weeks to let you know whether we wish to hold the story for further consideration or not. Final determinations are made after submission period closes. If you haven’t heard from us after 4 weeks, please send a brief query email with your name, title of your story, and the date your work was submitted to jue.submissions@gmail.com.

Other Stuff:

Proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar are a must. Don’t send us a revised version of a story we’ve already rejected unless we specifically request it. Keep an eye on our blog and our twitter and facebook feeds for news about the magazine, and submissions status updates.

Please go here for Art Submission guidelines. 

Via: Unlikely Story.

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