Author: Horror Tree

7 Tips for Writing Your Horror Story Suspenseful

7 Tips for Writing Your Horror Story Suspenseful

Not that many things exist now, that have been a part of human history as long as the horror genre has. Its inception takes place back in ancient times, when the tales about witches and spirits got people terrified. With time going by, horror stories have ingrained in national folklore of the majority of modern countries, with a slight difference connected with the specific culture of each nationality. Oral horror gave the start to written and cinematic ones, which have made horror one of the most popular genres.

 Even considering their prevalence, horror stories are far from being easy to write. It needs a true talent and good skills to compose a terrific story, which intimidates a reader by its plot rather than disgusting details as the abundance of blood and guts. This explains why horror stories may appear a hard thing for beginner writers, who, however, may ask academic writers for help on the special platforms. They do not necessarily compose the whole story themselves, but they may create a reference and guide them in the right direction in order to help them write better. 
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How to Write Horror For Kids and Teens?

How to Write Horror For Kids and Teens?

 

Horror stories are supposed to be scary, entertaining, and attention-grabbing. This is a universal rule that gets the thrill and excitement going in all the readers, regarding their age. So, why make a difference between adults and kids and teens? Because kids and teens have a mindset completely different from adults and you as a writer need to recognize that.

 

In addition, don’t think that kids and teens are easier to scare.

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3 Reasons Why Using Real-World Locations Can Improve Your Writing

We always hear about how many famous movies, video games, comics, and other fictional worlds were based on or inspired by real-world locations. We have Panem from the Hunger Games that resembles Ancient Rome; there is also the game, Dark Souls, where one of the locations in the game was heavily inspired by a cathedral in Milan; also, fans of  DC Comics know that Gotham City is an exaggerated replica of New York. 

 

What do these fictional worlds have in common? They can be enjoyed visually by the audience- no extra effort needed; which is easier and convenient for creators as well. How about written literature? Is it more worth it to write about a world or a space that you have to imagine from scratch? Let’s dive more into these questions in this article. 

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How Language Skills Can Help to Become a And Popular Writer

How Language Skills Can Help to Become a Popular Writer

 

“I want to be a writer!”

 

You might have said this phrase as a child, especially if you were (and still are) in love with books and the imaginary world they create. 

 

You’d be surprised, but writers are among the top 10 jobs American kids dream to get when they grow up (according to Zety’s survey):

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‘Ink’ Blog Tour: How Does the Flash Fiction Contest Work? by J. Scott Coatsworth

How Does the Flash Fiction Contest Work?

 Q&A With Director J. Scott Coatsworth

 

Every year, Queer Sci Fi holds a flash fiction contest, and hundreds of writers enter their stories. Once the dust clears, a brand-new anthology magically appears, filled with flash fiction goodness. Of course, there’s no real magic involved. Just hard work and experience. So let’s pull back the curtain a little, shall we?

How do you choose the theme each year?

Each year we rotate the honor among our four admins – Scott, Angel, Ben and Ryane. That judge comes up with 3-4 options – always a single word – and we discuss it in the group and choose one of them to be that year’s theme. Generally speaking, we like themes that are topical, that are open to multiple definitions/interpretations, and that don’t favor one of the four speculative fiction genres—sci-fi, fantasy, paranormal or horror—too much over the others.
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What Makes a Good Horror Story?

What Makes a Good Horror Story?

 

Let’s consider the vast catalog of dystopian and post-apocalyptic tales currently available. Now, add all of the works featuring zombies, vampires and other monsters – werewolves seem to be a perennial favorite. Top it all off with liberal splashes of gore, frightened screams and wide-eyed panic. 

 

And there, you have just a few elements that make up the horror genre.  

 

At its heart, horror intends to scare, shock or disgust its audience, but not so much that readers will turn away completely. The essential art of writing horror is creating enough of a visceral response to keep the reader hooked while reaching the outer limits of how far to go before you repel them entirely.

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Book Review: The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig

TW: graphic animal death, graphic animal abuse, parent/child abuse, mentions of sexual abuse, mentions of spousal abuse, homophobic terms, murder, gore, descriptions of child death/murder

Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links. If you purchase something through the links in this article we may receive a small commission or referral fee. This happens without any additional cost to you.

Nate Graves’ estranged abusive father wants to leave Nate’s childhood home to him when he dies. Not wanting to live in a house full of bad memories, Nate wants to sell the house and move on with his life; however, Nate’s wife Maddie convinces him to uproot their lives in Philadelphia and move to his childhood home hoping that it will bring the family closer together and give their son Oliver a fresh start.

Immediately after moving into the house, Nate begins to see visions of his dead father and a long-dead serial killer that used to kill his victims near the Graves’ home. Animals in the area exhibit odd behavior and show physical malformations. Maddie loses consciousness and all sense of time while working on her art. Oliver makes new friends, one of whom is obsessed with exposing him to dark magic that is contained in a logbook of accidents from an abandoned mine. The longer the family lives in Nate’s childhood home, the stranger the world around them becomes.

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A Love Of Reading

A Love of Reading

By Lauri Schoenfeld 

At a young age, I wondered if my mom was possessed. Her sudden burst of rage and anger directed toward me didn’t make sense. Sheer hatred lurked in her eyes, and I didn’t understand, but I wanted to. I believed that there was something good fighting within her. The only thing that made sense to me was that something took her, but she’d be back—one day.

Like the movies, I wanted to find some special water, “holy water,” to get whatever was inside her out, and it would be all better. She’d be fine. I’d have my mom back, even though I never really had her at all. She haunted herself and couldn’t see past the image of what she used to be. 
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